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BRAND X

Orphaned transracial international ungrateful insurgent Class Bastard.

Posts tagged womanism

Aug 31 '14

dynastylnoire:

bekkethatsall:

dynastylnoire:

weareallafricans:

Strolling, Ep 7 - Cecile Emeke 

A brand new episode of the short documentary series, featuring Abraham. We talked male feminists, patriarchy, crying, “great” britain, reparations for Africa, Palestine, Boko Haram, hair & more. 

Keep up to date with new episodes via http://strolling.cecileemeke.com

The amount of swooning I did watching this. He is everything

My brother is internet famous lool. 

O.O Tell him I say “Heyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy”

Aug 26 '14
this-isnt-your-captain-speaking:

I’m all out of words

this-isnt-your-captain-speaking:

I’m all out of words

(Source: mtvstyle)

Aug 11 '14

Author Scott Lynch responds to a critic of the character Zamira Drakasha, a black woman pirate in his fantasy book Red Seas Under Red Skies, the second novel of the Gentleman Bastard series.

downlo:

zillah975:

last-snowfall:

fuckyeahscifiwomenofcolour:

The bolded sections represent quotes from the criticism he received. All the z-snaps are in order.

Your characters are unrealistic stereotpyes of political correctness. Is it really necessary for the sake of popular sensibilities to have in a fantasy what we have in the real world? I read fantasy to get away from politically correct cliches. 


God, yes! If there’s one thing fantasy is just crawling with these days it’s widowed black middle-aged pirate moms. 

Real sea pirates could not be controlled by women, they were vicous rapits and murderers and I am sorry to say it was a man’s world. It is unrealistic wish fulfilment for you and your readers to have so many female pirates, especially if you want to be politically correct about it!

First, I will pretend that your last sentence makes sense because it will save us all time. Second, now you’re pissing me off. 

You know what? Yeah, Zamira Drakasha, middle-aged pirate mother of two, is a wish-fulfillment fantasy. I realized this as she was evolving on the page, and you know what? I fucking embrace it. 

Why shouldn’t middle-aged mothers get a wish-fulfillment character, you sad little bigot? Everyone else does. H.L. Mencken once wrote that “Every normal man must be tempted at times to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin slitting throats.” I can’t think of anyone to whom that applies more than my own mom, and the mothers on my friends list, with the incredible demands on time and spirit they face in their efforts to raise their kids, preserve their families, and save their own identity/sanity into the bargain. 

Shit yes, Zamira Drakasha, leaping across the gap between burning ships with twin sabers in hand to kick in some fucking heads and sail off into the sunset with her toddlers in her arms and a hold full of plundered goods, is a wish-fulfillment fantasy from hell. I offer her up on a silver platter with a fucking bow on top; I hope she amuses and delights. In my fictional world, opportunities for butt-kicking do not cease merely because one isn’t a beautiful teenager or a muscle-wrapped font of testosterone. In my fictional universe, the main characters are a fat ugly guy and a skinny forgettable guy, with a supporting cast that includes “SBF, 41, nonsmoker, 2 children, buccaneer of no fixed abode, seeks unescorted merchant for light boarding, heavy plunder.”

You don’t like it? Don’t buy my books. Get your own fictional universe. Your cabbage-water vision of worldbuilding bores me to tears. 

As for the “man’s world” thing, religious sentiments and gender prejudices flow differently in this fictional world. Women are regarded as luckier, better sailors than men. It’s regarded as folly for a ship to put to sea without at least one female officer; there are several all-female naval military traditions dating back centuries, and Drakasha comes from one of them. As for claims to “realism,” your complaint is of a kind with those from bigoted hand-wringers who whine that women can’t possibly fly combat aircraft, command naval vessels, serve in infantry actions, work as firefighters, police officers, etc. despite the fact that they do all of those things— and are, for a certainty, doing them all somewhere at this very minute. Tell me that a fit fortyish woman with 25+ years of experience at sea and several decades of live bladefighting practice under her belt isn’t a threat when she runs across the deck toward you, and I’ll tell you something in return— you’re gonna die of stab wounds.

What you’re really complaining about isn’t the fact that my fiction violates some objective “reality,” but rather that it impinges upon your sad, dull little conception of how the world works. I’m not beholden to the confirmation of your prejudices; to be perfectly frank, the prospect of confining the female characters in my story to placid, helpless secondary places in the narrative is so goddamn boring that I would rather not write at all. I’m not writing history, I’m writing speculative fiction. Nobody’s going to force you to buy it. Conversely, you’re cracked if you think you can persuade me not to write about what amuses and excites me in deference to your vision, because your vision fucking sucks.

I do not expect to change your mind but i hope that you will at least consider that I and others will not be buying your work because of these issues. I have been reading science fiction and fantasy for years and i know that I speak for a great many people. I hope you might stop to think about the sales you will lose because you want to bring your political corectness and foul language into fantasy. if we wanted those things we could go to the movies. Think about this! 

Thank you for your sentiments. I offer you in exchange this engraved invitation to go piss up a hill, suitable for framing.

Dude. I bounced off his first book in that series, but that character MIGHT just convince me to give it another try.

Also, Anne Bonny, Mary Read, Ching Shih, the Red Lady, Lai Sho Sz’en, Grace O’Malley, Sayyida al Hurra, the Lioness of Brittany, Mary Killigrew, Lo Hon-cho, and quite a few others.

LADY PIRATES REPRESENT.

This guy is such a patriarchal bigot that he actually wrote to Scott Lynch because he thinks all fictional worlds should be sexist and racist too. Lynch’s response was perfect.

image

Aug 11 '14
"Women invented all the core technologies that made civilization possible. This isn’t some feminist myth; it’s what modern anthropologists believe. Women are thought to have invented pottery, basketmaking, weaving, textiles, horticulture, and agriculture. That’s right: without women’s inventions, we wouldn’t be able to carry things or store things or tie things up or go fishing or hunt with nets or haft a blade or wear clothes or grow our food or live in permanent settlements. Suck on that.

Women have continued to be involved in the creation and advancement of civilization throughout history, whether you know it or not. Pick anything—a technology, a science, an art form, a school of thought—and start digging into the background. You’ll find women there, I guarantee, making critical contributions and often inventing the damn shit in the first place.

Women have made those contributions in spite of astonishing hurdles. Hurdles like not being allowed to go to school. Hurdles like not being allowed to work in an office with men, or join a professional society, or walk on the street, or own property. Example: look up Lise Meitner some time. When she was born in 1878 it was illegal in Austria for girls to attend school past the age of 13. Once the laws finally eased up and she could go to university, she wasn’t allowed to study with the men. Then she got a research post but wasn’t allowed to use the lab on account of girl cooties. Her whole life was like this, but she still managed to discover nuclear fucking fission. Then the Nobel committee gave the prize to her junior male colleague and ignored her existence completely.

Men in all patriarchal civilizations, including ours, have worked to downplay or deny women’s creative contributions. That’s because patriarchy is founded on the belief that women are breeding stock and men are the only people who can think. The easiest way for men to erase women’s contributions is to simply ignore that they happened. Because when you ignore something, it gets forgotten. People in the next generation don’t hear about it, and so they grow up thinking that no women have ever done anything. And then when women in their generation do stuff, they think ‘it’s a fluke, never happened before in the history of the world, ignore it.’ And so they ignore it, and it gets forgotten. And on and on and on. The New York Times article is a perfect illustration of this principle in action.

Finally, and this is important: even those women who weren’t inventors and intellectuals, even those women who really did spend all their lives doing stereotypical “women’s work”—they also built this world. The mundane labor of life is what makes everything else possible. Before you can have scientists and engineers and artists, you have to have a whole bunch of people (and it’s usually women) to hold down the basics: to grow and harvest and cook the food, to provide clothes and shelter, to fetch the firewood and the water, to nurture and nurse, to tend and teach. Every single scrap of civilized inventing and dreaming and thinking rides on top of that foundation. Never forget that."
Violet Socks, Patriarchy in Action: The New York Times Rewrites History (via o1sv)

(Source: sendforbromina)

Jul 13 '14
"Apparently, women of color were wearing their hair in such fabulous ways, adding jewels and feathers to their high hairdos and walking around with such beauty and pride that it was obscuring their status. This was very threatening to the social stability (read: white population) of the area at the time. The law was meant to distinguish women of color from their white counterparts and to minimize their beauty."
Jul 11 '14
resized:

youre-bey0nd-beautiful:

angrymuslimah:

"Gulabi Gang" is a gang of women in India who track down and beat abusive husbands with brooms.

this is too thug not to reblog

That’s not all they do - they’ve got more information on their website. 
What else they do that is awesome:
Stop child marriages
Persuade families to educate girl-child
Train women in self-defense
Oppose corruption in administration
Create awareness about the evils of dowry
Register FIRs against sex-offenders and abusive husbands
Publicly shame molesters
Encourage women to become financially independent

resized:

youre-bey0nd-beautiful:

angrymuslimah:

"Gulabi Gang" is a gang of women in India who track down and beat abusive husbands with brooms.

this is too thug not to reblog

That’s not all they do - they’ve got more information on their website

What else they do that is awesome:

  • Stop child marriages
  • Persuade families to educate girl-child
  • Train women in self-defense
  • Oppose corruption in administration
  • Create awareness about the evils of dowry
  • Register FIRs against sex-offenders and abusive husbands
  • Publicly shame molesters
  • Encourage women to become financially independent
Jul 7 '14

vthebookworm:

kreyolcoco:

thoughtsofablackgirl:

Girls&WomenToKnow: Leanna Archer

Meet Lenna Archer, who started her Leanna Inc. a haircare line at This Long  years old. Leanna all nautral organic hair products has generated over $ $100,000 in revenue. Leana develops and mixes each of her products (the original hair dressing was based on a family formula), and tracks orders and customer correspondence. Her parents and two brothers assist in bookkeeping, packaging, and product testing. The company sells its shampoos, conditioners, shea butter, and other products both in stores and online. 

Leanna is a philanthropist as well in 2008 she founded the Leanna Archer Education Foundation, an organization devoted to providing better opportunities for children in Haiti. Leanna’s goal is to built schools in Haiti, while providing a Safe learning environment for over 150 students.

Leanna as been featured in Forbes Magazine, Success Magazine, INC Magazine (30 under 30) and Ebony Magazine. Online web portal, AOL Black Voices, was also impressed with Leanna and positioned the Teen CEO as #5 on their list of “ Top 9 Young Lions” who are making Black History. Leanna has also been interviewed by several major media outlets, including NBC, MSNBC,ABC,FOX Business and BET.

HAITIAN EXCELLENCE! !!

Damn. That is just pure excellence.

Jun 26 '14
"Good afternoon. I am Mavutaseuv, Indian Girl with a Different Face. I am known as Diane Millich, and I am a citizen of the Southern Ute Indian tribe located in Ignacio, Colorado. When I was 26 years old, I dated a non-Indian, a white man. After six months, we were married. My non-Indian husband moved into my house on the reservation. To my shock, just days after our marriage, he assaulted me. After a year of abuse and more than a hundred incidences of being slapped, kicked, punched, and living in horrific terror, I left for good. During that year of marriage, I called the police many times. I called our Southern Ute tribal police department, but the law prevented them from arresting and prosecuting my husband because he was non-Indian. The county sheriff could not help me because I am a Native woman and the beatings occurred on tribal reservation land. After one beating, my ex-husband called the tribal police and the sheriff’s department himself just to show me that no one could stop him. All the times that I called the police and nothing was done only made my ex-husband believe he was above the law and untouchable. My ex-husband told me, ‘You promised us until death do us part, so death it shall be.’ Finally he arrived at my office armed with a gun. I am alive today only because my coworker pushed me out of harm’s way and took the bullet in his shoulder. For this crime he was finally arrested. But because he had never been arrested for any of the abuse against me, he was treated as a first-time offender. The state prosecutor and him reached a plea agreement of ‘aggravated driving under revocation’. If the bill being signed today were law when I was married, it would have allowed my tribe to arrest and prosecute my abuser. When this bill is signed, The Violence Against Women Act will finally reach Native American women like me."
Diane Millich at the signing of the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act March 7, 2014 [x]  (via nitanahkohe)

(Source: whes)

Jun 26 '14
"Sometimes people try to destroy you, precisely because they recognize your power—not because they don’t see it, but because they see it and they don’t want it to exist."
Excerpt from Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Much More by Janet Mock (via queerbetweenthelines)
Jun 24 '14

So I used to be a martial artist

eyctobiolojayy:

littlewendycat:

ladypanboner:

thecolourfreedom:

textuallyaroused:

I started going to the dojo when I was in sixth grade. It was a very masculine environment; there weren’t a lot of other girls there but the male senseis who ran the place were great guys and they genuinely loved having female students because we were such a rarity.

Now back in sixth grade I was tinier even than what I am now, and now I’m only 5’2. Then I was probably even under 5’0. I mean I was a squirt of a kid. But I loved to fight; I loved to be in the ring, I loved the adrenaline rush and I loved having punches hurled at me. It was fun for me. Our dojo did full-contact sparring, which was pretty brutal. These were the only rules:

  • you must wear a mouth guard and gloves
  • no hits below the belt

That’s pretty much it.

Anyway every Thursday was Fight Night, where all we did was spar each other. And on my First Night Sensei Diven—who has since passed, bless his soul—paired me up with this really cocky and assholish brown belt to show me the ropes a little. This brown belt kid was bigger than me by a lot; he must have been at least six feet and twice my weight. But man was I excited to get into the ring! I had a fight boiling in my blood.

Now, Sensei Diven was not a stupid man and he hated high-ranking kids that showed a bad attitude. This kid had a bad attitude. So he must have seen the evil gleam in my eye from a mile away and decided it was time for a little improvisation.

Anyway, Sensei yelled, “Start!” and I leapt into fight stance and the other kid didn’t even put his hands up. He was laughing at me, sneering, the whole nine yards. “I’ll give you a free one.” he joked, and he slapped his side. “You barely weigh 100 pounds and you’re a girl. So go ahead, little girl. Hit me.”

And I hit him. I cocked my leg up as high as it would go and roundhouse kicked him right in the ribs with all of my might and all of the contempt I felt for his stupid cocky face which was covered in ugly-ass freckles and his nasty-ass braces. And I heard a crack. Like a real snap! sound. And the kid has a look of surprise on his face like it was nobody’s business, and then he goes right to the floor like a sack of potatoes.

Now, Sensei Diven leisurely strolls over from the group of black belts who are laughing their asses off at me, the tiny little white belt, sending my Goliath to the floor. I mean they’re laughing so hard they look like they’re about to pee themselves. They think it’s a game. And in his great booming voice he hollers:

“Brown Belt! Why are you on the floor? Do you not see this white belt has been assigned to fight you?”

And meanwhile he is just crying. I broke one of his ribs.

And Sensei Diven just squats down next to this poor kid and whispers, “Don’t you know that women are made of pain?”

I AM SCREAMING.

Such a badass.

oh my god best

“Don’t you know that women are made of pain?” might be one of the most powerful, accurate descriptions of women ive ever heard.