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BRAND X

Orphaned transracial international ungrateful insurgent Class Bastard.

Posts tagged texas

Feb 24 '14
ardora:

"And on the Mexican border, Someone has ripped through a fence Of reinforced chicken wire With bolt cutters, And erected a hammock By suspending it Between two of the fence’s Concrete pillars.
After swinging gently back and forth, From Texas to Mexico and then From Mexico back to Texas, They doze off; contemptuous Of the security guards Patrolling this artificial demarcation – For, once upon a time, Texas was Mexico And Texas didn’t exist.
When Eugene Debs was imprisoned For conscientious objection in World War One He said, on September 11th 1915, ‘I have no country to fight forMy country is the earthI’m a citizen of the world.’”
– Heathcote Williams, “No Borders”

ardora:

"And on the Mexican border,
Someone has ripped through a fence
Of reinforced chicken wire
With bolt cutters,
And erected a hammock
By suspending it
Between two of the fence’s
Concrete pillars.

After swinging gently back and forth,
From Texas to Mexico and then
From Mexico back to Texas,
They doze off; contemptuous
Of the security guards
Patrolling this artificial demarcation –
For, once upon a time,
Texas was Mexico
And Texas didn’t exist.

When Eugene Debs was imprisoned
For conscientious objection in World War One
He said, on September 11th 1915,
I have no country to fight for
My country is the earth
I’m a citizen of the world.’

– Heathcote Williams, “No Borders

Aug 16 '13
"

In September of 1829 slavery was prohibited in Mexico. Because the politically connected Texans were outraged, one month later, the law was changed to allow slavery only in Texas. A few months later in early 1830, Mexico altered its policy under a new government that was less interested in catering to Texas. Mexico passed a law that prohibited further American settlement, and banned importation of additional slaves into Texas. The Mexican abolition movement, following the pattern seen around the world, had apparently pressured for more restrictions. This was a strict proviso, but for the Texans it was survivable, as they already had thousands of slaves within Mexico. The law must have created difficulties for the Texans and been a great source of irritation to them as they worked to develop their slave labour based agricultural economy. There were other grievances by this time, such as the amount of taxes the Texans were required to pay, but none struck home so much as the “bread and butter” issue of slavery. Without it, the Texans could not make a profit and ultimately would be out of business.

As the American population of Texas grew increasingly disgruntled with the various restrictions imposed by Mexico, an independence movement developed led by Stephen Austin. He presented a petition for independence to the Mexican government in 1833, and was then arrested and jailed until 1835. In 1835, there were about 20,000 Texans and 4000 slaves in Texas. In December of 1835 the newly crowned dictator General Antonio Santa Anna amended the slavery laws to ban slavery in Texas.

The settlers and their newly freed leader Austin quickly announced that they would secede from Mexico. To the great dismay of the Texans, however, in December of 1835 President Santa Ana extended the slavery ban to Texas to appease Mexican abolitionists. The Texans immediately rebelled and declared that they were seceded from Mexico, and declared the Republic of Texas. One of their first actions was to ban free blacks from the Republic. Not content with the possibility of withdrawing from Mexico, the Texans enlisted the help of citizens of the United States in order to preserve slavery and the huge tracts of cotton growing land. This resulted in the famous siege and battle at the Alamo, a Catholic mission taken over by the Texans.

"

Remembering The Alamo was just as much about slavery as it was about Texas freedom from the slave abolishing country of Mexico (via thehuskybro)

now i did NOT know that.

(via deafmuslimpunx)

Jun 26 '13
angryqueershakespeare:

starkdisassembled:

because it felt like the right time for a kind reminder that they want to restrict clinics to the point that there would be only 5 in a landmass this size, and deny this many people with uteruses their medical autonomy.

for any people that don’t understand the scale of this fuckery, here you go

angryqueershakespeare:

starkdisassembled:

because it felt like the right time for a kind reminder that they want to restrict clinics to the point that there would be only 5 in a landmass this size, and deny this many people with uteruses their medical autonomy.

for any people that don’t understand the scale of this fuckery, here you go

Jan 26 '13

The Orphan Trains: Part I

My mother and I were very close because I was all she had and she was all I had. On January 7th of 1918, my mother came to the school and she had a suitcase. She was going to go and have tests taken care of, see why she was having these awful headaches. And that was the last I saw of her.

I’d just finished eating and this matron came by and tapped us along the head. “You’re going to Texas. You’re going to Texas.” When she came to me, I looked up. I said, “I can’t go. I’m not an orphan. My mother’s still living. She’s in a hospital right here in New York.”

"You’re going to Texas." No use arguing.

I didn’t cry. I guess I was too angry to cry. We were going too far too fast.

That was an ordeal that no child should go through. They pulled us and pushed us and shoved us. And this old man— I had never seen anything like anybody chewing tobacco. I knew nothing about it. This old man came up and his mouth was all stained brown and I thought, well, he’d been eating chocolate candy or something. Then he said, “Open your mouth.” I looked at him and he— “I want to see about your teeth.” I opened my mouth and he stuck his finger in my mouth and just… rubbed over my teeth. And his old dirty hands just— I wanted to bite, but I didn’t.

We got to the house and this old lady met me and says, “You look all right.” And her daughter-in-law was waiting for her husband to come out because the war was over now and her husband was stationed at Langley Field, Virginia, and he would be home soon. She told me just exactly why those people wanted me, that she would be gone and I was growing up and I would be big enough to take care of that house. And that’s all they wanted with me, but she wouldn’t be there to help me.

And said, “What can I do?” She says, “Go back to the hotel and tell them that this is just not for you.” So she drew me a map of where I was, back to the Beckham, and I walked in and I never got such dirty looks in my life as I did when they saw me walk in that door.

"Well, what happened to you?" And I said, "They didn’t want a child. They wanted a slave."

The next morning, the door of the room opened up and two men were standing in the doorway and one of them— I started here and looked up, like that, and I thought I would never quit looking. That was, I thought, the biggest man I ever saw in my life. Probably was. It was my dad, my foster— would be my foster dad. And he said, “May we come in?” And the matron said, “Oh, yes. Come on. This is Hazel, sitting right here on the floor.” Says, “Get up, Hazel, and shake hands.”

And I got up and he says, “You’re going to be my little girl.” And I says, “If you ever hit me, I’ll never get up.” And he never did.

When I got the letter that my mother had died, I just felt like the door had closed. I just walked out of the house, walked down the road. It was cotton-picking time. Daddy had said I could stay at the house. I did, but I didn’t cry. I just felt, “Well, this is the end of something.”

And there was always that hope that she would get better and I would get a letter or maybe she would come. Somehow or other, I still had that hope.

— Hazelle Latimer, Sent West, Age 11, The American Experience: Orphan Trains

(Source: brandx)

Feb 10 '12

What if that man who shot up his daughter’s computer was black?

the-third-hobbit:

anedumacation:

No, seriously.

What if he was black?

What if he wasn’t some polished white dude with a cowboy hat and a job in IT, what if he was a black father taking to the internet to complain about his ungrateful child? And then what if he shot up his daughter’s computer and uploaded that clip to youtube?

Would anyone be praising him for being a model father then?

Or would we talk about how POC hurt their children, and how horrible and evil that is? We’d start talking about how certain kinds of people are just naturally harsh on their kids, and we’d take out the statistics for abuse on various minority groups. There wouldn’t be any cutesy “Texas forever” commentary from so-called progressive websites — we’d all be hopping mad at the culture of violence that exists in impoverished communities, we’d be talking about oppressed brown and black women, under the heel of their abusive husbands and fathers. 

I mean, I just don’t think there would be quite as much uncritical analysis of this video, if the father wasn’t middle-class, respectable, and white. We’re so willing to give white fathers and mothers the benefit of the doubt.

Just saying. 

my buddy tried to get me to watch it after giving me a run down of what it was, i shut it down at the 31 second mark. i could not stand that man. i agree with the above.

White dudes + Firearms = NEVER A GOOD THING.

(Source: anedumacationisnomore)

Nov 4 '11

shortformblog:

Yesterday, this brutal video made the rounds. In it, a then-16-year-old girl was brutally attacked by her father for downloading music illegally on the internet back in 2004. (Warning: it’s a tough watch.) The girl, Hillary Adams, now 23, released the video as her parents were in the midst of a custody battle. She secretly taped the incident and only told him about the video recently. ”I told him I had the video,” she said. “He didn’t seem to think anything of it, and basically dared me to post it.” On its own, it seems like a harsh overreaction, but it’s made all the worse when you consider that the father in the video is a county judge who specializes in child abuse cases. You’d imagine that this would be the kind of case he’d have to deal with at his job. Based on comments the Texas judge has made, he may not be very remorseful over the incident. Here are some reactions:

  • father Aransas County, Texas Court-at-Law Judge William Adams defended the 2004 incident like so: ”In my mind, I haven’t done anything wrong other than discipline my child after she was caught stealing. And I did lose my temper, but I’ve since apologized.”
  • daughter Here’s how his daughter, Hillary, reacted to that statement: “It’s a shining perfect example of his personality and he believes he can do no wrong. … He will cover up rather than admit to what he did and try to come clean, which is what I really want him to do.” source

(Source: shortformblog)

Nov 2 '11

thedailywhat:

Follow Up of the Day: The Texas judge at the center of a controversial video allegeding to show a severe beating he administered to his daughter in 2004 as a punishment for using the Internet has confirmed to KRIS-TV that he is in fact the person conducting the alleged child abuse.

“It happened years ago; I apologized,” he told 6 News. “It’s not as bad as it looks on tape.” Aransas County officials report that an investigation was launched after people began “flooding phone lines to compalin.”

Judge Adams says he has contacted the Judicial Review in Austin and expects to clear his name through the investigation.

On Facebook, Hallie Adams, the judge’s ex-wife, acknowledge her former spouse’s “current and continuing abuse of my children and me.” She did not apologize for her part in the beating.

[kris.]

An elected arbiter of justice sadistically beating his disabled daughter for a completely harmless infraction? And getting away with it for years and years? And how this cowardly, brainless news coverage refers to the horrifying, atrocious video clip as “controversial.”

That “mother” should be sentenced jail time as well.

Again:

Here is Judge Adams work contact info just in case you would like to drop him a line so you can let him know how much of a man he is for beating his disabled teenage daughter.

Judge William Adams

301 N. Live Oak St.

Rockport, TX 78382 

Phone: 361-790-0138 

Fax: 361-790-0185

(Source: thedailywhat)

Nov 1 '11

bringtheruckuss:

Family law judge from Texas beats and abuses his own daughter for using the internet. She uploaded the video. 

2004: Aransas County Court-At-Law Judge William Adams took a belt to his own teenage daughter as punishment for using the internet to acquire music and games that were unavailable for legal purchase at the time. She has had ataxic cerebral palsy from birth that led her to a passion for technology, which was strictly forbidden by her father’s backwards views. The judge’s wife was emotionally abused herself and was severely manipulated into assisting the beating and should not be blamed for any content in this video. The judge’s wife has since left the marriage due to the abuse, which continues to this day, and has sincerely apologized and repented for her part and for allowing such a thing, long before this video was even revealed to exist. Judge William Adams is not fit to be anywhere near the law system if he can’t even exercise fit judgement as a parent himself. Do not allow this man to ever be re-elected again. His “judgement” is a giant farce. Signed, Hillary Adams, his daughter.

Here is Judge Adams work contact info just in case you would like to drop him a line so you can let him know how much of a man he is for beating his disabled teenage daughter.

Judge William Adams

301 N. Live Oak St.

Rockport, TX 78382 

Phone: 361-790-0138 

Fax: 361-790-0185


Reblog now.

Oct 30 '11
republicanidiots:

“I am sure young Mr. Bush has all the many amiable qualities you describe, and so will find a place at one of many fine institutions around the country.  But not at the University of Texas.” 
—- Former Dean Page Keeton, University of Texas Law School, responding to a letter of recommendation written for George W. Bush.

republicanidiots:

“I am sure young Mr. Bush has all the many amiable qualities you describe, and so will find a place at one of many fine institutions around the country.  But not at the University of Texas.” 

—- Former Dean Page Keeton, University of Texas Law School, responding to a letter of recommendation written for George W. Bush.

Sep 23 '11