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BRAND X

Orphaned transracial international ungrateful insurgent Class Bastard.

Posts tagged survivor

Sep 2 '14
Aug 26 '14

moniquill:

fangirling-personified:

justsjwthings:

allinom:

I’m all about unforgiving and hating and holding grudges because it keeps me safe and mentally healthy and I don’t care about your stupid feel-good quotes about forgiving everyone everywhere always so you can take your feel-good emotionally manipulative apologist bullshit and shove it 

have fun with that.

this attitude is a piece of shit and I doubt you’ll be mentally healthy if you allow yourself to fill with poisonous hatred and grudges toward everyone and never forgive and just be a bitter nasty person

And herein lies the problem with the way we construct ‘healing’ in this fucked up society.

People are honestly led to believe that there’s some kind of binary between ‘people who hate’ and ‘people who don’t.

As if you can’t feel legitimate anger that does not go away toward particular individuals who have harmed you and yet still be loving and caring and friendly and forgiving and supporting to -other people entirely- who have not harmed you, or have only done so in superficial ways because they’re fallible humans.

Nope, that’s silly. Clearly if you hate anyone, you must hate everyone and be a seething hate ball. Better pressure everyone to be a ball of warm loving giving peaceful high-road-taking light and joy at all times. Wouldn’t want to validate a survivor’s emotional response to trauma or let them know that the coping skills they’ve developed to keep themselves safe and keep the people who harmed them from creeping back into their lives are acceptable in any way. That might allow them to feel some kind of closure or safety, and we can’t have that.

Jun 19 '14

carryustothestars asked:

Could you please post a link to the article where you got the information from about the 7 year old who was beaten to death? Or is it all in the CNN transcript? I'm sorry -- not very much is coming up on Google. This information needs to be shared, it's so terrible :(

My information on Lydia Schatz is from real life connections with my child advocacy NGO work as a survivor of the ethnocidal “therapy/parenting” that demonizes and murders adoptees and foster kids, but much of what I posted about her on tumblr can be obtained from that linked CNN “Beaten to Death in the Name of God” transcript, yes.

There’s a Wikipedia article on Lydia Schatz that should be in the top Google results (um, it’s the very first one when I type in her name) that lists 10 different news article references. All linked and available online.

Jun 2 '14

youknowyouareasurvivorwhen:

you know you are a survivor when feel guilty for literally the stupidest things — things that arent your fault, too, because someone has manipulated you into thinking that it is.

May 22 '14

beccastew asked:

I apologize for everything you had to go through! Children deserve better your blog is amazing!

Aww. T’weren’t your doing, cutie pie.

Just doing my part to contaminate the entire human race! <3

Oh! And remember, ladies:

image

“As for the problem of the unmarried mother… if she has… been able to give away the living symbol of her ‘sin’ or ‘mistake’… she is ‘solved’ as a social problem… If she keeps her child and requires economic aids for the support of herself and child, she is not ‘paying’.’”
—“Unmarried Mothers,” Social Work & Social Problems, Nathan E. Cohen, Editor

X

May 15 '14

Dear white Americans who follow this tumblr (or heck, even white Western Europeans)

Between this white male middle-aged weeabo derailing the torture of murder of 7-year-old Lydia Schatz with such paternalistic neoliberal rage as to not be believed

and this white savior piece of shit who thinks that infertility entitles First Worlders(tm) to other people’s children from nations they’ve colonized and committed genocide in

It’s time to come collect your own.

That means that if you are a genuine ally of internationally adopted orphans (both legitimate and falsified), you will educate them and help defend me.

It is not my job, as someone who survived the systemic child abuse that especially targets transracial and Third World(tm) adoptees like Cassandra Killpack, to have to educate my oppressors. That’s where allies come in.

Because these people are currently attacking me with the kind of outrage that only people who hold dear the white savior industrial complex can possess — there’s just something about the truth that it kidnaps and tortures children that makes them turn on any survivors of said kidnapping and torture.

After all, if we’re silenced, they don’t have to be confronted with living proof.

X

Apr 29 '14
haiweewicci:

nativeamericannews:
Sacajawea: If Not For Her, We Could Be Saluting the British Flag
Few women in U.S. history have had more influence on the nation’s history than the young Lemhi Shoshone woman, Sacajawea. It’s very likely that Lewis and Clark would never have reached the Pacific Ocean had it not been for her help. White settlement would have been different. Indian wars throughout the western half of the country would have been altered. We might even be saluting the British flag rather than the American flag. Sacajawea’s role was gigantic.
MY GIRL. She is of our tribe and we are so proud of her out in Inyo County. The Lewis and Clark thing was just a small part of her epic life.
She was actually born with the name Poi Naipi (Little Grass Maiden). She and two of her friends (Nai Nukkwi, Patsu Naipi) were kidnapped by a hostile band of Hidatsa, who had a strange practice of replacing their own dead children with the children of other tribes.
Poi Naipi’s “adopted” parents didn’t like her much so instead of sending her home they freaking sold her to a drunken French guy named Charbonneau. This man was bastard incarnate. To put this into perspective: He had once been stabbed in the face in Manitoba when he was caught raping a young girl there. At this time, being forced to marry him, Poi Naipi was about 9 years old. And, he already had one other child bride.
He was very abusive, he drank a lot, and at some point Poi Naipi started calling herself Tsaikka Tsa Wea. It means in our language, “One Who Carries a Burden.” You see how this got corrupted to Sacajawea over time.
At one point on the L&amp;C expedition Clark caught Charbonneau beating Tsaikka Tsa Wea and her newborn son. Well, Clark and Lewis beat the crap out of Charbonneau and told him to knock it off. Later, after the expedition, Clark paid for Tsaikka Tsa Wea’s son to go to school and live in his home.
That’s not even the cool part though. As an older woman Tsaikka Tsa Wea said “To hell with this, I’m going home.” This was a pretty big thing to do, understand that she had practically been raised by her abusive scumbag husband and it is very hard for women who have been systematically abused since childhood to learn to stand up for themselves, especially against their aggressors. But, she did it. Traveling all by herself, she found the Northern Shoshone encampment on Wind River, where Chief Wusik-He was with some Eastern Shoshone (and some Western at the time) (this would later go on to be the permanent Eastern settlement, those guys are still out there today). She was reunited with her brother, who by that point had been named Daigwani of the Northern Shoshone. Everybody welcomed her home, her friends, her family, and she broke down crying to hear them call her their “Lost Woman” (Wadze Waipu). For her resilience and cunning she was appointed the personal advisor to Wusik-He. As a very old woman was buried with the name “Chief Woman,” later her son and her nephew were buried on either side of her. Those graves are still there on Wind River today.
Poi Naipi and the Wide Ridge Clan, never forget you, your story is always being told. Miikwa katukan, tunna wunupuhantu tung’atiwan naangwunupuhantu

haiweewicci:

nativeamericannews:

Sacajawea: If Not For Her, We Could Be Saluting the British Flag

Few women in U.S. history have had more influence on the nation’s history than the young Lemhi Shoshone woman, Sacajawea. It’s very likely that Lewis and Clark would never have reached the Pacific Ocean had it not been for her help. White settlement would have been different. Indian wars throughout the western half of the country would have been altered. We might even be saluting the British flag rather than the American flag. Sacajawea’s role was gigantic.

MY GIRL. She is of our tribe and we are so proud of her out in Inyo County. The Lewis and Clark thing was just a small part of her epic life.

She was actually born with the name Poi Naipi (Little Grass Maiden). She and two of her friends (Nai Nukkwi, Patsu Naipi) were kidnapped by a hostile band of Hidatsa, who had a strange practice of replacing their own dead children with the children of other tribes.

Poi Naipi’s “adopted” parents didn’t like her much so instead of sending her home they freaking sold her to a drunken French guy named Charbonneau. This man was bastard incarnate. To put this into perspective: He had once been stabbed in the face in Manitoba when he was caught raping a young girl there. At this time, being forced to marry him, Poi Naipi was about 9 years old. And, he already had one other child bride.

He was very abusive, he drank a lot, and at some point Poi Naipi started calling herself Tsaikka Tsa Wea. It means in our language, “One Who Carries a Burden.” You see how this got corrupted to Sacajawea over time.

At one point on the L&C expedition Clark caught Charbonneau beating Tsaikka Tsa Wea and her newborn son. Well, Clark and Lewis beat the crap out of Charbonneau and told him to knock it off. Later, after the expedition, Clark paid for Tsaikka Tsa Wea’s son to go to school and live in his home.

That’s not even the cool part though. As an older woman Tsaikka Tsa Wea said “To hell with this, I’m going home.” This was a pretty big thing to do, understand that she had practically been raised by her abusive scumbag husband and it is very hard for women who have been systematically abused since childhood to learn to stand up for themselves, especially against their aggressors. But, she did it. Traveling all by herself, she found the Northern Shoshone encampment on Wind River, where Chief Wusik-He was with some Eastern Shoshone (and some Western at the time) (this would later go on to be the permanent Eastern settlement, those guys are still out there today). She was reunited with her brother, who by that point had been named Daigwani of the Northern Shoshone. Everybody welcomed her home, her friends, her family, and she broke down crying to hear them call her their “Lost Woman” (Wadze Waipu). For her resilience and cunning she was appointed the personal advisor to Wusik-He. As a very old woman was buried with the name “Chief Woman,” later her son and her nephew were buried on either side of her. Those graves are still there on Wind River today.

Poi Naipi and the Wide Ridge Clan, never forget you, your story is always being told. Miikwa katukan, tunna wunupuhantu tung’atiwan naangwunupuhantu

(Source: indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com)

Apr 24 '14

strugglingtobeheard:

ethiopienne:

[TW: sexual assault] Check out the incredibly important conversation happening on Suey Park’s timeline about the “victim” vs. “survivor” binary in sexual assault rhetoric.

this is great. i saw someone arguing w/ another telling them to not identify as a victim & it was too triggering to engage in at the time. But it seems our society really hates victims, always saying you want to be a victim and you’re making yourself into a victim. But with sexual assault and rape especially, some of us want to be able to say Yes, we are Victims. this was a crime, an assault, an attack and we were victimized. being a survivor is great but even without the label we are surviving that shit everyday after. let people claim their own terms and places within their healing and naming how they want. i should thank Suey on twitter too.

(Source: ethiopienne)

Mar 20 '14
flinch-nerds:

This tweet is so important to me

flinch-nerds:

This tweet is so important to me

Mar 14 '14