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BRAND X

Orphaned transracial international ungrateful insurgent Class Bastard.

Posts tagged oppression

Jul 8 '14

petitsirena:

sticks and stones may break my bones, but language dictates everything from social norms to legislation and it’s indeed often used to bolster violence and oppression sooOo

May 26 '14

Tweets concerning UCSB shooting, misogyny, and masculinity by Imran Siddiquee, Director of Communications for The Representation Project, the organization behind Miss Represenation and the soon-to-be-released documentary The Mask You Live In

Now THAT’s a man for men to live up to.

Apr 28 '14

yulebug:

how ignorant do you have to be that you think “oppression works both ways” do you even know what oppression is

(Source: speedlimit15)

Feb 10 '14
  • *Post making fun of oppressed people*
  • Oppressed people: Hey, that isn't cool.
  • Oppressors: GEEZ, TAKE A JOKE!!! GOSH, YOU CAN'T BE CODDLED FOREVER THE WORLD WON'T CATER TO UR SILLY WHIMS!!
  • *Post making fun of oppressors*
  • Oppressors: This shit. I cannot STAND this shit right here. YOU REALLY THINK THAT BECAUSE YOU'RE "''''OPPRESSED''''" YOU CAN BE MEAN TO MAJORITY GROUPS? HATE GETS US NOWHERE GUYS. STOP FUCKING BULLYING OR I'LL STOP SUPPORTING YOU AND YOUR MOVEMENT. FUCKING HYPOCRITES, I SWEAR TO GOD. THIS IS /JUST/ AS BAD AS WHEN WE OPPRESS YOU!
Jan 27 '14
marfmellow:

Goooooo in! I am home!

marfmellow:

Goooooo in! I am home!

Jan 18 '14

Anonymous asked:

Do you not believe hate breeds more hate?

blue-author:

cishits:

I believe “hate breeds more hate” is a phrase that

  1. is used to blame the victims of hateful actions for those actions
  2. deliberately ignores the source of the hate
  3. excuses the oppressor
  4. attempts to control how the oppressed react to their oppressors

If Person A says something cissexist to Person B & Person B responds aggressively, Person B is not “breeding more hate.” Person A is obviously already hateful. Person B has every single fucking right to be angry. 

We have every single fucking right to be angry.

If the people who said this really believed that “hate breeds hate”, they would understand Person B’s reaction and be addressing their advice towards Person A.

Nov 23 '13
"Look, without our stories, without the true nature and reality of who we are as People of Color, nothing about fanboy or fangirl culture would make sense. What I mean by that is: if it wasn’t for race, X-Men doesn’t sense. If it wasn’t for the history of breeding human beings in the New World through chattel slavery, Dune doesn’t make sense. If it wasn’t for the history of colonialism and imperialism, Star Wars doesn’t make sense. If it wasn’t for the extermination of so many Indigenous First Nations, most of what we call science fiction’s contact stories doesn’t make sense. Without us as the secret sauce, none of this works, and it is about time that we understood that we are the Force that holds the Star Wars universe together. We’re the Prime Directive that makes Star Trek possible, yeah. In the Green Lantern Corps, we are the oath. We are all of these things—erased, and yet without us—we are essential."
Junot Díaz, “The Junot Díaz Episode" (18 November 2013) on Fan Bros, a podcast “for geek culture via people of colors” (via elledy)

(Source: kynodontas)

Oct 24 '13
"In a colorblind society, white people, who are unlikely to experience disadvantages due to race, can effectively ignore racism, justify the current social order, and feel more comfortable with their relatively privileged standing in society (Fryberg, 2010). Most minorities, however, who regularly encounter difficulties due to race, experience colorblind ideologies quite differently. Colorblindness creates a society that denies their negative racial experiences, rejects their cultural heritage, and invalidates their unique perspectives."
 Monica Williams, Ph.D, “Colorblind Ideology is a Form of Racism,” Psychology Today

(Source: brandx)

Oct 7 '13
"

To survive, subjugated people must understand people with power, but the reverse is not true. When members of devalued groups have a critical awareness of their positions, they earn a standpoint that may allow them to see the world with less bias.

Standpoint theory claims that marginalized groups can generate unique insights into how a society works. Women, minorities, gays and lesbians, people of lower socioeconomic class, intersexuals, transsexuals, and others who are outside the cultural center may see the society from perspectives that are less distorted, less biased, and more layered than those who occupy more central social locations. Marginalized perspectives can inform all of us about how our society operates. Maria Lugones and Elizabeth Spelman (1983) point out that dominant groups have the luxury of not having to understand the perspective of less privileged groups.

They don’t need to learn about others in order to survive.

"

- Gendered Lives: Communication, Gender, & Culture,

Julia T. Wood (via lola-forizzle)

Another reason why I’ve never truly envied my oppressors. Who’d wanna condemn themselves to an entire life of such ignorance and ineptitude?

Oct 3 '13
"

If you’re a boy writer, it’s a simple rule: you’ve gotta get used to the fact that you suck at writing women and that the worst women writer can write a better man than the best male writer can write a good woman. And it’s just the minimum. Because the thing about the sort of heteronormative masculine privilege, whether it’s in Santo Dommingo, or the United States, is you grow up your entire life being told that women aren’t human beings, and that women have no independent subjectivity. And because you grow up with this, it’s this huge surprise when you go to college and realize that, “Oh, women aren’t people who does my shit and fucks me.”

And I think that this a huge challenge for boys, because they want to pretend they can write girls. Every time I’m teaching boys to write, I read their women to them, and I’m like, “Yo, you think this is good writing?” These motherfuckers attack each other over cliche lines but they won’t attack each other over these toxic representations of women that they have inherited… their sexist shorthand, they think that is observation. They think that their sexist distortions are insight. And if you’re in a writing program and you say to a guy that their characters are sexist, this guy, it’s like you said they fucking love Hitler. They will fight tooth and nail because they want to preserve this really vicious sexism in the art because that is what they have been taught.

And I think the first step is to admit that you, because of your privilege, have a very distorted sense of women’s subjectivity. And without an enormous amount of assistance, you’re not even going to get a D. I think with male writers the most that you can hope for is a D with an occasional C thrown in. Where the average women writer, when she writes men, she gets a B right off the bat, because they spent their whole life being taught that men have a subjectivity. In fact, part of the whole feminism revolution was saying, “Me too, motherfuckers.” So women come with it built in because of the society.

It’s the same way when people write about race. If you didn’t grow up being a subaltern person in the United States, you might need help writing about race. Motherfuckers are like ‘I got a black boy friend,’ and their shit sounds like Klan Fiction 101.

The most toxic formulas in our cultures are not pass down in political practice, they’re pass down in mundane narratives. It’s our fiction where the toxic virus of sexism, racism, homophobia, where it passes from one generation to the next, and the average artist will kill you before they remove those poisons. And if you want to be a good artist, it means writing, really, about the world. And when you write cliches, whether they are sexist, racist, homophobic, classist, that is a fucking cliche. And motherfuckers will kill you for their cliches about x, but they want their cliches about their race, class, queerness. They want it in there because they feel lost without it. So for me, this has always been the great challenge.

As a writer, if you’re really trying to write something new, you must figure out, with the help of a community, how can you shed these fucking received formulas. They are received. You didn’t come up with them. And why we need fellow artists is because they help us stay on track. They tell you, “You know what? You’re a bit of a fucking homophobe.” You can’t write about the world with these simplistic distortions. They are cliches. People know art, always, because they are uncomfortable. Art discomforts. The trangressiveness of art has to deal with confronting people with the real. And sexism is a way to avoid the real, avoiding the reality of women. Homophobia is to avoid the real, the reality of queerness. All these things are the way we hide from encountering the real. But art, art is just about that.

"