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BRAND X

Orphaned transracial international ungrateful insurgent Class Bastard.

Posts tagged native american

May 23 '14
otipemsiw:

assangistan:

MUST SEE
via hick-ups:

A photograph from the 1870’s showing tens of thousands of bison skulls. They were mass slaughtered by the U.S. Army to make room for cattle and force Native American tribes into starvation.


[bolding mine]
Mass slaughter of buffalo and bison took place in Canadian territory as well, and was part of a deliberate campaign to break Indigenous resistance to (further) settler incursions onto Native land and the railroad.  The removal of the buffalo also meant that when it came time to sign treaties, the Canadian government could more or less set any terms it saw fit and Indigenous leaders basically had to comply with them or their people would freeze and starve (that’s if gov officials even bothered to translate the actual terms of the treaty at all).
The “disappearance” of the buffalo is narrativized as part of a larger myth surrounding the “disappearing Indian” whose absence clears the land for the incoming white pioneers to take their place.  The murder, destruction, slaughter of bison and buffalo was a tactic essential to the genocidal colonial project.

otipemsiw:

assangistan:

MUST SEE

via hick-ups:

A photograph from the 1870’s showing tens of thousands of bison skulls. They were mass slaughtered by the U.S. Army to make room for cattle and force Native American tribes into starvation.

[bolding mine]

Mass slaughter of buffalo and bison took place in Canadian territory as well, and was part of a deliberate campaign to break Indigenous resistance to (further) settler incursions onto Native land and the railroad.  The removal of the buffalo also meant that when it came time to sign treaties, the Canadian government could more or less set any terms it saw fit and Indigenous leaders basically had to comply with them or their people would freeze and starve (that’s if gov officials even bothered to translate the actual terms of the treaty at all).

The “disappearance” of the buffalo is narrativized as part of a larger myth surrounding the “disappearing Indian” whose absence clears the land for the incoming white pioneers to take their place.  The murder, destruction, slaughter of bison and buffalo was a tactic essential to the genocidal colonial project.

Apr 29 '14
haiweewicci:

nativeamericannews:
Sacajawea: If Not For Her, We Could Be Saluting the British Flag
Few women in U.S. history have had more influence on the nation’s history than the young Lemhi Shoshone woman, Sacajawea. It’s very likely that Lewis and Clark would never have reached the Pacific Ocean had it not been for her help. White settlement would have been different. Indian wars throughout the western half of the country would have been altered. We might even be saluting the British flag rather than the American flag. Sacajawea’s role was gigantic.
MY GIRL. She is of our tribe and we are so proud of her out in Inyo County. The Lewis and Clark thing was just a small part of her epic life.
She was actually born with the name Poi Naipi (Little Grass Maiden). She and two of her friends (Nai Nukkwi, Patsu Naipi) were kidnapped by a hostile band of Hidatsa, who had a strange practice of replacing their own dead children with the children of other tribes.
Poi Naipi’s “adopted” parents didn’t like her much so instead of sending her home they freaking sold her to a drunken French guy named Charbonneau. This man was bastard incarnate. To put this into perspective: He had once been stabbed in the face in Manitoba when he was caught raping a young girl there. At this time, being forced to marry him, Poi Naipi was about 9 years old. And, he already had one other child bride.
He was very abusive, he drank a lot, and at some point Poi Naipi started calling herself Tsaikka Tsa Wea. It means in our language, “One Who Carries a Burden.” You see how this got corrupted to Sacajawea over time.
At one point on the L&C expedition Clark caught Charbonneau beating Tsaikka Tsa Wea and her newborn son. Well, Clark and Lewis beat the crap out of Charbonneau and told him to knock it off. Later, after the expedition, Clark paid for Tsaikka Tsa Wea’s son to go to school and live in his home.
That’s not even the cool part though. As an older woman Tsaikka Tsa Wea said “To hell with this, I’m going home.” This was a pretty big thing to do, understand that she had practically been raised by her abusive scumbag husband and it is very hard for women who have been systematically abused since childhood to learn to stand up for themselves, especially against their aggressors. But, she did it. Traveling all by herself, she found the Northern Shoshone encampment on Wind River, where Chief Wusik-He was with some Eastern Shoshone (and some Western at the time) (this would later go on to be the permanent Eastern settlement, those guys are still out there today). She was reunited with her brother, who by that point had been named Daigwani of the Northern Shoshone. Everybody welcomed her home, her friends, her family, and she broke down crying to hear them call her their “Lost Woman” (Wadze Waipu). For her resilience and cunning she was appointed the personal advisor to Wusik-He. As a very old woman was buried with the name “Chief Woman,” later her son and her nephew were buried on either side of her. Those graves are still there on Wind River today.
Poi Naipi and the Wide Ridge Clan, never forget you, your story is always being told. Miikwa katukan, tunna wunupuhantu tung’atiwan naangwunupuhantu

haiweewicci:

nativeamericannews:

Sacajawea: If Not For Her, We Could Be Saluting the British Flag

Few women in U.S. history have had more influence on the nation’s history than the young Lemhi Shoshone woman, Sacajawea. It’s very likely that Lewis and Clark would never have reached the Pacific Ocean had it not been for her help. White settlement would have been different. Indian wars throughout the western half of the country would have been altered. We might even be saluting the British flag rather than the American flag. Sacajawea’s role was gigantic.

MY GIRL. She is of our tribe and we are so proud of her out in Inyo County. The Lewis and Clark thing was just a small part of her epic life.

She was actually born with the name Poi Naipi (Little Grass Maiden). She and two of her friends (Nai Nukkwi, Patsu Naipi) were kidnapped by a hostile band of Hidatsa, who had a strange practice of replacing their own dead children with the children of other tribes.

Poi Naipi’s “adopted” parents didn’t like her much so instead of sending her home they freaking sold her to a drunken French guy named Charbonneau. This man was bastard incarnate. To put this into perspective: He had once been stabbed in the face in Manitoba when he was caught raping a young girl there. At this time, being forced to marry him, Poi Naipi was about 9 years old. And, he already had one other child bride.

He was very abusive, he drank a lot, and at some point Poi Naipi started calling herself Tsaikka Tsa Wea. It means in our language, “One Who Carries a Burden.” You see how this got corrupted to Sacajawea over time.

At one point on the L&C expedition Clark caught Charbonneau beating Tsaikka Tsa Wea and her newborn son. Well, Clark and Lewis beat the crap out of Charbonneau and told him to knock it off. Later, after the expedition, Clark paid for Tsaikka Tsa Wea’s son to go to school and live in his home.

That’s not even the cool part though. As an older woman Tsaikka Tsa Wea said “To hell with this, I’m going home.” This was a pretty big thing to do, understand that she had practically been raised by her abusive scumbag husband and it is very hard for women who have been systematically abused since childhood to learn to stand up for themselves, especially against their aggressors. But, she did it. Traveling all by herself, she found the Northern Shoshone encampment on Wind River, where Chief Wusik-He was with some Eastern Shoshone (and some Western at the time) (this would later go on to be the permanent Eastern settlement, those guys are still out there today). She was reunited with her brother, who by that point had been named Daigwani of the Northern Shoshone. Everybody welcomed her home, her friends, her family, and she broke down crying to hear them call her their “Lost Woman” (Wadze Waipu). For her resilience and cunning she was appointed the personal advisor to Wusik-He. As a very old woman was buried with the name “Chief Woman,” later her son and her nephew were buried on either side of her. Those graves are still there on Wind River today.

Poi Naipi and the Wide Ridge Clan, never forget you, your story is always being told. Miikwa katukan, tunna wunupuhantu tung’atiwan naangwunupuhantu

(Source: indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com)

Apr 2 '14

oreides:

winnememwintuvoice:

devitsa:

Hey, you should watch this if Native/Indigenous are of importance/interest to you. And if they aren’t of importance or interest to you then you’re probably a fuckin’ asshole.

This is our tribe, the Winnemem Wintu of Northern California.

We are not really a “Ghost Tribe”, since we are very much alive, despite Gold Rush murders, boarding schools, and the Shasta Dam, which flooded our beloved McCloud River homeland, wiped out our salmon runs, and stole our water.  We received none of the compensation promised in federal legislation.

Now the Water Mongers and Big Oil want to build the dam higher, and flood out more of our sacred sites, including the dance ground of our Coming of Age Ceremony.  Fresno US Representative Jim Costa (R) two weeks ago introduced a bill, co-signed by state Democratic congressmen, to raise Shasta Dam 18 feet higher.  The expected water will be used to feed the growing fracking industry in the Central Valley, as well as grow export crops in the desert and service massive housing developments in the desert.  This is all part of Gov. Jerry Brown’s “Brown Water Plan”, which includes destroying the California Delta with massive Twin Tunnels that could potentially draw off all of the Sacramento River’s fresh water, destroying the estuary, and the fish and other aquatic life that depend on it.

But we are not giving up.  We know it is our responsibility to continue to be Winnemem, to continue to sing for the Water, and protect the places that make us Winnemem.

We will not be drowned without a fight!

Please contact your congressperson and tell them that we are already the victims of uncorrected government injustice, and to vote NO on any plans to raise Shasta Dam.

ONLY a little over 300 notes? Boost this.

Mar 28 '14
californiastatelibrary:

Paiute Baby. (1906) Andrew Alexander Forbes, photographer

californiastatelibrary:

Paiute Baby. (1906) Andrew Alexander Forbes, photographer

Mar 20 '14

prynnette:

Eva Mirabal wasn’t just the first female Native American cartoonist—she was one of the first Native American cartoonists period, and one of the first female creators to have her own strip. Born Eah-Ha-Wa (“Fast Growing Corn” in the Tiwa language), Mirabal grew up surrounded by art: her father served as an artists’ model, she spent years studying art at the Santa Fe Indian school under director Dorothy Dunn, who recognized her “ability to translate everyday events into scenes of warmth and seminaturalistic beauty” right off the bat, and at nineteen was featured as part of a gallery exhibition in Chicago. World War II brought her work to a wider audience when, after enlisting in the Woman’s Army Corps in 1943, she was commissioned to create a strip for the Corps newsletter. G.I. Gertie gave canny, irreverent voice to women in the military, and Mirabal was quickly commissioned for more work, most notably her posters advertising war bonds. After the war, she served as an Artist-in-Residence at Southern Illinois University, painted murals for schools, planetariums, and military facilities, and eventually returned to the Taos Pueblo. Her later works, signed not as Eva Mirabal but as Eah-Ha-Wah, depict everyday Pueblo life with uncommon passion and candor.

Today, Eva Mirabal is far from celebrated. You’re really only going to find the same G.I.Gertie strip over and over again if you search online, many of her murals have been demolished, and her tumblr tag is empty. But her work—intimate, warm, and keenly felt—stands strong, decades after her death. The comics and art world stand in sore need of women like Mirabal: G.I. Gertie was not the work of a male cartoonist, cracking jokes about those silly women and their silly woman concerns, nor are her paintings the product of a white observer, smearing his bias across a community he “discovered.” Mirabal was a woman writing for women, a member of the Taos Pueblo creating for the Taos Pueblo—an artist committed to her world and its validity.

(Third in a series on women in the comics industry.) 

Feb 25 '14
lakotapeopleslawproject:

"For me, ‘no’ would never be an answer; we would never reach the end of our efforts to help. And if I’m gonna demand that for my grandson, how can I sleep at night if I don’t demand that for your grandson? Or your niece, or your daughter?”-Judge Thorne, advocating for #Native children.Watch more of Judge Thorne: http://lakota.cc/1h85BNDRead more: www.LakotaLaw.org/about-usSIGN THE PETITION!: www.LakotaLaw.org/Action

lakotapeopleslawproject:

"For me, ‘no’ would never be an answer; we would never reach the end of our efforts to help. And if I’m gonna demand that for my grandson, how can I sleep at night if I don’t demand that for your grandson? Or your niece, or your daughter?”
-Judge Thorne, advocating for #Native children.

Watch more of Judge Thorne: http://lakota.cc/1h85BND
Read more: www.LakotaLaw.org/about-us

SIGN THE PETITION!: www.LakotaLaw.org/Action

Feb 2 '14
havecrayonswilltravel:

anonymousatheist420:

And now you know…
The real “Lone Ranger,” it turns out, was an African American man named Bass Reeves, who the legend was based upon. Perhaps not surprisingly, many aspects of his life were written out of the story, including his ethnicity. The basics remained the same: a lawman hunting bad guys, accompanied by a Native American, riding on a white horse, and with a silver trademark.Historians of the American West have also, until recently, ignored the fact that this man was African American, a free black man who headed West to find himself less subject to the racist structure of the established Eastern and Southern states.While historians have largely overlooked Reeves, there have been a few notable works on him. Vaunda Michaux Nelson’s book, Bad News for Outlaws: The Remarkable Life of Bass Reeves, Deputy U.S. Marshal, won the 2010 Coretta Scott King Award for best author. Arthur Burton released an overview of the man’s life a few years ago. Black Gun, Silver Star: The Life and Legend of Frontier Marshal Bass Reeves recounts that Reeves was born into a life of slavery in 1838. His slave-keeper brought him along as another personal servant when he went off to fight with the Confederate Army, during the Civil War.Reeves took the chaos that ensued during the war to escape for freedom, after beating his “master” within an inch of his life, or according to some sources, to death. Perhaps the most intriguing thing about this escape was that Reeves only beat his enslaver after the latter lost sorely at a game of cards with Reeves and attacked him.After successfully defending himself from this attack, he knew that there was no way he would be allowed to live if he stuck around.Reeves fled to the then Indian Territory of today’s Oklahoma and lived harmoniously among the Seminole and Creek Nations of Native American Indians.After the Civil War finally concluded, he married and eventually fathered ten children, making his living as a Deputy U.S. Marshall in Arkansas and the Indian Territory. If this surprises you, it should, as Reeves was the first African American to ever hold such a position.Burton explains that it was at this point that the Lone Ranger story comes into play. Reeves was described as a “master of disguises”. He used these disguises to track down wanted criminals, even adopting similar ways of dressing and mannerisms to meet and fit in with the fugitives, in order to identify them.Reeves kept and gave out silver coins as a personal trademark of sorts, just like the Lone Ranger’s silver bullets. Of course, the recent Disney adaptation of the Lone Ranger devised a clever and meaningful explanation for the silver bullets in the classic tales. For the new Lone Ranger, the purpose was to not wantonly expend ammunition and in so doing devalue human life. But in the original series, there was never an explanation given, as this was simply something originally adapted from Reeves’ personal life and trademarking of himself. For Reeves, it had a very different meaning, he would give out the valuable coins to ingratiate himself to the people wherever he found himself working, collecting bounties. In this way, a visit from the real “Lone Ranger” meant only good fortune for the town: a criminal off the street and perhaps a lucky silver coin.Like the Lone Ranger, Reeves was also an expert crack shot with a gun. According to legend, shooting competitions had an informal ban on allowing him to enter. Like the Lone Ranger, Reeves rode a white horse throughout almost all of his career, at one point riding a light grey one as well.Like the famed Lone Ranger legend Reeves had his own close friend like Tonto. Reeves’ companion was a Native American posse man and tracker who he often rode with, when he was out capturing bad guys. In all, there were close to 3000 of such criminals they apprehended, making them a legendary duo in many regions.The final proof that this legend of Bass Reeves directly inspired into the story of the Lone Ranger can be found in the fact that a large number of those criminals were sent to federal prison in Detroit. The Lone Ranger radio show originated and was broadcast to the public in 1933 on WXYZ in Detroit where the legend of Reeves was famous only two years earlier.Of course, WXYZ and the later TV and movie adaptions weren’t about to make the Lone Ranger an African American who began his career by beating a slave-keeper to death. But now you know. Spread the word and let people know the real legend of the Lone Ranger.
Via https://plus.google.com/b/113376504911684406239/109950959928032580820

okay no, but for real, this dude was a badass. he was basically the black batman of the wild west.
acording to wiki: “ Reeves brought in some of the most dangerous criminals of the time, but was never wounded, despite having his hat and belt shot off on separate occasions.”
here’s an article that details some of his career.

havecrayonswilltravel:

anonymousatheist420:

And now you know…


The real “Lone Ranger,” it turns out, was an African American man named Bass Reeves, who the legend was based upon. Perhaps not surprisingly, many aspects of his life were written out of the story, including his ethnicity. The basics remained the same: a lawman hunting bad guys, accompanied by a Native American, riding on a white horse, and with a silver trademark.

Historians of the American West have also, until recently, ignored the fact that this man was African American, a free black man who headed West to find himself less subject to the racist structure of the established Eastern and Southern states.

While historians have largely overlooked Reeves, there have been a few notable works on him. Vaunda Michaux Nelson’s book, Bad News for Outlaws: The Remarkable Life of Bass Reeves, Deputy U.S. Marshal, won the 2010 Coretta Scott King Award for best author. Arthur Burton released an overview of the man’s life a few years ago. Black Gun, Silver Star: The Life and Legend of Frontier Marshal Bass Reeves recounts that Reeves was born into a life of slavery in 1838. His slave-keeper brought him along as another personal servant when he went off to fight with the Confederate Army, during the Civil War.

Reeves took the chaos that ensued during the war to escape for freedom, after beating his “master” within an inch of his life, or according to some sources, to death. Perhaps the most intriguing thing about this escape was that Reeves only beat his enslaver after the latter lost sorely at a game of cards with Reeves and attacked him.

After successfully defending himself from this attack, he knew that there was no way he would be allowed to live if he stuck around.

Reeves fled to the then Indian Territory of today’s Oklahoma and lived harmoniously among the Seminole and Creek Nations of Native American Indians.

After the Civil War finally concluded, he married and eventually fathered ten children, making his living as a Deputy U.S. Marshall in Arkansas and the Indian Territory. If this surprises you, it should, as Reeves was the first African American to ever hold such a position.

Burton explains that it was at this point that the Lone Ranger story comes into play. Reeves was described as a “master of disguises”. He used these disguises to track down wanted criminals, even adopting similar ways of dressing and mannerisms to meet and fit in with the fugitives, in order to identify them.

Reeves kept and gave out silver coins as a personal trademark of sorts, just like the Lone Ranger’s silver bullets. Of course, the recent Disney adaptation of the Lone Ranger devised a clever and meaningful explanation for the silver bullets in the classic tales. For the new Lone Ranger, the purpose was to not wantonly expend ammunition and in so doing devalue human life. But in the original series, there was never an explanation given, as this was simply something originally adapted from Reeves’ personal life and trademarking of himself. For Reeves, it had a very different meaning, he would give out the valuable coins to ingratiate himself to the people wherever he found himself working, collecting bounties. In this way, a visit from the real “Lone Ranger” meant only good fortune for the town: a criminal off the street and perhaps a lucky silver coin.

Like the Lone Ranger, Reeves was also an expert crack shot with a gun. According to legend, shooting competitions had an informal ban on allowing him to enter. Like the Lone Ranger, Reeves rode a white horse throughout almost all of his career, at one point riding a light grey one as well.

Like the famed Lone Ranger legend Reeves had his own close friend like Tonto. Reeves’ companion was a Native American posse man and tracker who he often rode with, when he was out capturing bad guys. In all, there were close to 3000 of such criminals they apprehended, making them a legendary duo in many regions.

The final proof that this legend of Bass Reeves directly inspired into the story of the Lone Ranger can be found in the fact that a large number of those criminals were sent to federal prison in Detroit. The Lone Ranger radio show originated and was broadcast to the public in 1933 on WXYZ in Detroit where the legend of Reeves was famous only two years earlier.

Of course, WXYZ and the later TV and movie adaptions weren’t about to make the Lone Ranger an African American who began his career by beating a slave-keeper to death. But now you know. Spread the word and let people know the real legend of the Lone Ranger.

Via https://plus.google.com/b/113376504911684406239/109950959928032580820

okay no, but for real, this dude was a badass. he was basically the black batman of the wild west.

acording to wiki: “ Reeves brought in some of the most dangerous criminals of the time, but was never wounded, despite having his hat and belt shot off on separate occasions.”

here’s an article that details some of his career.

Dec 26 '13
kidkloud:


A photograph from the 1870’s showing tens of thousands of bison skulls. They were mass slaughtered by the U.S. Army to make room for cattle and force Native American tribes into starvation.

Never forget that white people pushed the American bison to the brink of extinction to kill more Indians. Never fucking forget.

Petition to rebrand all “white Americans” as white SETTLERS. We need to start thinking of white + [insert colonized nationality here] as an oxymoron.

kidkloud:

A photograph from the 1870’s showing tens of thousands of bison skulls. They were mass slaughtered by the U.S. Army to make room for cattle and force Native American tribes into starvation.

Never forget that white people pushed the American bison to the brink of extinction to kill more Indians. Never fucking forget.

Petition to rebrand all “white Americans” as white SETTLERS. We need to start thinking of white + [insert colonized nationality here] as an oxymoron.

(Source: hick-ups)

Dec 4 '13
lakotapeopleslawproject:

"Native Americans in Woodbury County have a SEVEN TIMES greater chance of losing parental rights, or a child to the state." The community of Sioux City, Iowa marched in protest. "You’ve heard it said many times that you are who your father is, you are who your mother is. Some of our Native children don’t have the luxury of being able to say that, and that’s why our work here is important." Video: http://lakota.cc/1dQs2HR

lakotapeopleslawproject:

"Native Americans in Woodbury County have a SEVEN TIMES greater chance of losing parental rights, or a child to the state." The community of Sioux City, Iowa marched in protest. "You’ve heard it said many times that you are who your father is, you are who your mother is. Some of our Native children don’t have the luxury of being able to say that, and that’s why our work here is important." Video: http://lakota.cc/1dQs2HR

Nov 30 '13
lakotapeopleslawproject:

A new report shows that the epidemic of illegal seizures of Native foster children is not just a #SouthDakota issue. In#Nebraska, #Native children are 10 TIMES more likely to become foster children. The director of Social Services for the Santee #Sioux Tribe knows this has a long history: “The harsh reality is this is the result of the #genocide tactics of the United States government”. Read:http://lakota.cc/1dAf9xm

lakotapeopleslawproject:

A new report shows that the epidemic of illegal seizures of Native foster children is not just a #SouthDakota issue. In#Nebraska#Native children are 10 TIMES more likely to become foster children. The director of Social Services for the Santee #Sioux Tribe knows this has a long history: “The harsh reality is this is the result of the #genocide tactics of the United States government”. Read:http://lakota.cc/1dAf9xm