Install Theme

Your web-browser is very outdated, and as such, this website may not display properly. Please consider upgrading to a modern, faster and more secure browser. Click here to do so.

BRAND X

Orphaned transracial international ungrateful insurgent Class Bastard.

Posts tagged kyriarchy

Sep 18 '14
"To be ill adjusted to a deranged world is not a breakdown."
Jeanette Winterson

(Source: sharkradish)

Sep 14 '14

How White Supremacy Creates Paternalism and Violence In “Sex Positivity” Discourse

gradientlair:

I find “sex positivity” politics to be paternalistic and violent. Paternalistic and violent. My tolerance for it is at about the level of my tolerance of street harassment now. These politics remain White supremacist, cishet-focused and anti-intersectional. They are about forced sexuality in unwelcome spaces (and then judgment when that force is critiqued) and assault (when people are aware of others’ boundaries, have been made aware several times and yet find pleasure not in their sexual freedom itself, but in denying choice to others) more than about empowerment for all women since no one sexual politic about “all women” could exist any more than any one articulation of feminism in praxis could ever exist

If intersectionality (H/T Kimberlé Crenshaw) reveals that not all women experience gender in the same way, if it shows that not all women—even ones that share race/gender/class/sexual orientation oppression for which intersectionality itself was first articulated on—experience oppression in the same way, why on earth would a politics of “sex positivity” that continues to center Whiteness, heterosexuality, phallocentrism, and almost a willful disregard for the varying histories of sexual politics for women who are not White (and especially Black women for whom the construction of White womanhood could not exist without making Black womanhood the antithesis) be something accurate and of interest to me?

There is no articulation of “sex positivity” by mainstream feminism that will ever mean anything to me. It is regularly paternalism and violence. In the same way that their feminism itself does not speak to my experience and I regularly have to avoid it or interrogate it—hence womanism shapes my lens by which I view, experience and challenge the world—is the same way that I have to avoid or interrogate their “sex positivity” politics. One can only be triggered on a daily basis for so long. One can only stomach the paternalism of White sermons about how sex is “political” for some people for so long. Oh how nice, sexual politics history from women who are always considered human and “people” to start with. Must be nice. (Really White women, you’re gonna educate me on feminism? This is laughable. Check the repertoire.) This paternalism is what causes their concern trolling for Black women who express their sexuality freely and openly yet judgment for ones whose sexual politics may more often involve the word NO, as I wrote about in For Me, Sex Positivity Involves The Word “NO.”

For some reason, lack of discernment and lack of respect for boundaries is now called “liberation.” So, I have to applaud every disgusting, poorly made, hideous, and violent sexual Vine video that comes across my Twitter timeline or is forced into my mentions to “prove” how “sex positive” I am. Every sexual photo, especially of a phallus, must be praised. Every non-sexual conversation that I have in peace with someone that I actually like in social media—which is so, so few people—has to be forcefully turned into a conversation where someone who I have never seen in my life then discusses their sexual intercourse frequency, desires, or fantasies. Every time I share an image of a celebrity or “beautiful” person, I can’t get replies on the quality of the photograph (I’m a photographer, sue me) and the beauty of the person (since other types of attraction exist; not solely sexual); people have to go a step further with graphic sexual explanations and forced and repeated sexual commentary that dominates my Twitter mentions for hours or days. I don’t even mean simple sexual comments such as "my body is ready" or "that person in the photo can get it!" which coming from people that I know and trust can be very funny and jokes I’ve made myself (though admittedly I don’t want to hear this every single time I share a photo). These comments that I am speaking of are usually much more graphic and violent at times. Worse, these people will then conflate my rejection of their violence as me being anti-sex in general or anti-sex work which is categorically false. Their slander is attached to the idea that I must accept their violence to “prove” I support women.

Much of this endless violence on a daily basis—yes, a daily and at times hourly occurrence—is only in response to the last several months of me discussing asexuality. Some of this is very new abuse. Some people who would’ve never said a thing to me about sex before now do so solely because I write about asexuality. People feel that I should be punished for this identification because of several factors. In general, asexuality is misunderstood and/or hated. It is the one time I’ve watched some queer people align with their oppressors, some heterosexual people, to degrade asexual people. They’re a team on the topic. A lot of it has to do with how I am perceived in the male gaze—as “pretty” quite often, thereby I should automatically be “available” to men, particularly cishet Black men. If a person is viewed as “attractive” then how dare they choose not to be sexual (though some asexual people have had sex before and/or do have sex; attraction is not behavior). It also has to do with how I am perceived in the White Gaze—as a Black woman, thereby “hypersexual” and automatically heterosexual. Thus, speaking of my perspectives and experiences as an ace violates other people’s perception of who I should be and thereby they feel that I should be punished. Hence the paternalism and violence.

Obviously being a Black woman complicates this. Some White women behave as if they’re getting “street cred” by forcing sexual conversations with me. This is why at past jobs White women would immediately tell me about all of the Black men they’ve fucked or their sexual desires when I barely cleared my 90 days at jobs, when we had no relationship other than getting paychecks from the same place. Their consistent need to dominate and consume where Black bodies are concerned shapes their “sex positivity.” It feeds their eat pray love syndrome of “slumming” and fucking their way to “liberation” by use of Black bodies and bodies of colour as tools and props. And when the racism involved in this “sex positivity” is called out, they claim it is “misogyny” even if the ones doing the calling out are Black women. If the “purity” of White womanhood is “liberated” by mimicking the stereotypical concept of the “deviance” of Black womanhood, then they have to project every sexual action—whether words, forced conversations, stereotypes, cultural appropriation, or actual sex with Black people—onto any Black people that they can. What better person to do it on than a Black woman who is an ace since to them asexuality for Black women has always meant the loving “mammy” who listens, not the sexual orientation and empowered stance that asexuality can be and is for me, as I wrote about in Black Womanhood, Asexuality and Agency. Instead, asexuality, queerness and heterosexuality for Black women is viewed as “the mammy,” “the deviant” and “the Jezebel” in the White Gaze. Oh boy, oh boy the White supremacy to unpack from “sex positivity” makes my skin fucking crawl. The impact of White supremacy on sexuality itself is something that I discussed in The Large Space That White Supremacy Occupies In Conversations About Sexuality.

"Sex positivity" as articulated by Black women hasn’t been perfect for me either, but much better and definitely much safer. While there are a few Black women who also do not seem to understand boundaries and respect, feel that forced sexuality conversation is “freedom” (and why they do is much different from why White women do), and that “sex positivity” is more performative than intrinsic to Black feminist or womanist politics, many have to be told something only once. If I say, “well this particular thing is a NO for me” they’re told once. We don’t argue about it on a daily basis. There’s no paternalism or violence. And this definitely is shaped by the fact that our bodies and sexual choices have been colonized for so long that some of us are committed to not also being oppressors. It’s more imperative for us since our value as human beings is regularly tied to sexuality based on misogynoiristic lies and oppressive constructions such as controlling images. Black women don’t have the luxury of pretending that “sex positivity” as articulated by mainstream feminism is a blanket liberating tool. Most of it rests on the notion of “deviant” Black womanhood anyway. That’s why Black women clearly make more effort and intersectionality is considered in “sex positivity” as opposed to a space where our liberation is based on the degradation of another woman in the way that mainstream feminism’s “sex positivity” remains anti-intersectional while standing on the backs of women who aren’t cishet and White. (When I want to hear and experience messages of what doesn’t feel like abusive and oppressive notions about sexuality, I often turn to some Black women’s music.)

I’ve talked to Black women about consent, dating, sexual intercourse, sexual orientation, desire, same-race relationships, interracial relationships, celibacy, BDSM, sex work and more with an ease and safety that is not there for me with Whites or men. And since the latter refuse to acknowledge how stereotypes about who I am as a Black woman matters to them more than who I am, Trudy, the person they may have followed online for months or years, their conversations remain cyclically abusive, paternalistic and down right violent. For the ones who aren’t simply ignorant and presumptuous about my sexual orientation and sexuality, it’s purposeful harm they’re engaging in. Their need to harm me is so important, as if they do not already harm me via their privilege and via White supremacy and patriarchy which benefits them. So this “extra” need to harm on an interpersonal level is so caustically violent and sickening. Worse, some seem to equate my choice to engage in conversation about sexuality at times with permission for them to use that discourse to harm me at unrelated and/or non-consensual times. I do not feel safe discussing anything about sexuality with Whites (and I mean in a sociopolitical sense; I am NOT making a value judgment on interpersonal interracial relationships). 

I am done with “sex positivity” as it is currently articulated. I don’t want this White supremacist capitalist cisheteropatriarchal construction anywhere near me any more than I want mainstream feminism anywhere near me. In fact, I would argue that it IS mainstream feminism. My womanism is always one that embraces people of any sexual orientation, the right to any consensual sexual choices or non-sexual choices without stigma and shame rooted in oppression that facilitate oppression, the space for intersectional perspectives on sexuality and why notions of gender, womanhood, choice and agency vary, and the space to acknowledge while respect of choice and agency themselves is critical, actual worshipping of each individual choice even when that choice is harmful for me as a Black woman and only benefits White women is antithetical to the wholeness that womanism articulates. My womanism is not one that can indulge White supremacy as “sex positive.” 

Sexual politics will never be intersectionality-neutral space. As long as “sex positivity” remains about forcing sexuality and only particular conceptions of sexuality, it will remain abusive and beneficial only to a very small group of women, the same ones who regularly get to decide what is feminist or not while standing on the backs of the women they’re judging. If “sex positivity” means that White women get to decide what my boundaries are, it is White supremacy. If it means that only sexual intercourse itself matters, not all the politics that shape sex long before the bedroom, it will remain patriarchal. If it means that the history of the colonization of Black women’s bodies must be excluded from the conversation when that colonization is what White womanhood itself cannot exist without, it will remain oppressive.

A week ago someone said to me that they thought that “sex positivity” was supposed to be "sex is good." I replied I thought it was ”any consensual sexual or non-sexual choice should be considered valid and stigma-free.” Obviously my thoughts on the matter don’t even remotely relate to “sex positivity.” I was delusional. And of course the "if it’s not perfect, then it’s not the thing mentioned" people will come to derail. The same ones who claim TERFs or racists aren’t “real” feminists because they don’t want to take responsibility for how actual feminists harm will claim that the people who do what I have described here aren’t “really” “sex positive.” They can save it. My disinterest is palpable.

I have no problem with sexuality itself; clearly. I discuss it often with responsible people, which of course is then derailed by violent notions of “sex positivity” or the actual “sex is shame” type of respectability politics-loving patriarchal misogynoiristic type of people. My problem is about *how* people choose to engage me on the topic; without consent, with paternalism and with a frame of violence. My problem with “sex positivity” as popularly articulated is my problem with White supremacy or patriarchy. It oppresses me. It does not liberate me. This "we’ll show them!" attitude where since sex is shamed then forced sexuality becomes pride is a binary that I want no part of. The fact that people need to “perform” their non-consensual “sex positivity” for me on a triggering hourly/daily basis—especially after asked not to on a daily basis—is violence. There’s nothing “positive” about it. 

Related Post: Physical Arousal As “Proof” Of The Non-Existence of Asexuality Is Bigoted And Supports Rape Culture

Sep 12 '14
flippydoodle:

thatssoscience:

What Happened to the Computer Girls? 
Believe it or not, in the 1960’s, programming was seen as women’s work. It was even touted as being “just like planning a dinner”.
So what happened?
Eventually male programmers wanted to raise their status above “women’s work”. So they actively discouraged women from these positions, designed hiring tests rigged for men, and even created the stereotype that programmers are disinterested in people. No wonder in the years since, it’s still a male dominated field. Women earned only 18% of the computer science degrees awarded in 2008-2011. 
Alright ladies, we need to bust this myth. It’s been too long. Find organizations like Scientista or Sally Ride Science that help encourage women and girls in STEM interests. Find mentors and connect with other women interested in STEM. 

Computer Science departments in universities are some of the most racist, sexist, downright misogynist hell holes, with the worst kind of men. Everyone from male professors to male TAs are bullying arseholes who eschew the worst kind of “white male victim” complex. Not only do they treat female students like crap, they also pick on female professors in the department. Many male professors don’t help female students, and male TAs are creepy fucks who think they can flirt with you if you go to them for help, especially if you’re a non-white woman. 

flippydoodle:

thatssoscience:

What Happened to the Computer Girls? 

Believe it or not, in the 1960’s, programming was seen as women’s work. It was even touted as being “just like planning a dinner”.

So what happened?

Eventually male programmers wanted to raise their status above “women’s work”. So they actively discouraged women from these positions, designed hiring tests rigged for men, and even created the stereotype that programmers are disinterested in people. No wonder in the years since, it’s still a male dominated field. Women earned only 18% of the computer science degrees awarded in 2008-2011. 

Alright ladies, we need to bust this myth. It’s been too long. Find organizations like Scientista or Sally Ride Science that help encourage women and girls in STEM interests. Find mentors and connect with other women interested in STEM. 

Computer Science departments in universities are some of the most racist, sexist, downright misogynist hell holes, with the worst kind of men. Everyone from male professors to male TAs are bullying arseholes who eschew the worst kind of “white male victim” complex. Not only do they treat female students like crap, they also pick on female professors in the department. Many male professors don’t help female students, and male TAs are creepy fucks who think they can flirt with you if you go to them for help, especially if you’re a non-white woman. 

Sep 7 '14
obenibo:

THIS is White Privilege.
This is the price white people who appropriate blackness pay for committing numerous crimes. They get to be successful actors once they drop this “phase”.
Meanwhile a black person would get the most ridiculous of prison sentences for even one of these.
HE BLINDED A MAN. HE HAS A HATE CRIME UNDER HIS BELT.  And he’s a successful actor.
Y’all need not worry about Justin Bieber. He’ll be just fine.
Unfortunately.

obenibo:

THIS is White Privilege.

This is the price white people who appropriate blackness pay for committing numerous crimes. They get to be successful actors once they drop this “phase”.

Meanwhile a black person would get the most ridiculous of prison sentences for even one of these.

HE BLINDED A MAN. HE HAS A HATE CRIME UNDER HIS BELT.
And he’s a successful actor.

Y’all need not worry about Justin Bieber. He’ll be just fine.

Unfortunately.

Sep 2 '14
funkies:

facts tho

funkies:

facts tho

Aug 23 '14
"Black girls don’t get told we are beautiful enough. Black girls aren’t always told we can be princesses. Cute, sweet, innocent, pure- these are not words black girls often hear associated with us. Fast, sassy, mouthy, too grown, angry, aggressive- those are the words that get shot at us like darts. Black girls are not girls- we are mini women who are forced to be strong. You must tell black girls they are beautiful, innocent, sweet, magical. You must treat black girls as girls. Then, you can talk about black girl characters whose looks and femininity doesn’t matter. Otherwise, you are just maintaining the status quo- denying black girls our beauty and femininity."

Brittney Jones (via beautiful-ambition)

Some things to ponder…

(via aurorelocdnloaded)

(Source: octobermoe)

Aug 11 '14

Author Scott Lynch responds to a critic of the character Zamira Drakasha, a black woman pirate in his fantasy book Red Seas Under Red Skies, the second novel of the Gentleman Bastard series.

downlo:

zillah975:

last-snowfall:

fuckyeahscifiwomenofcolour:

The bolded sections represent quotes from the criticism he received. All the z-snaps are in order.

Your characters are unrealistic stereotpyes of political correctness. Is it really necessary for the sake of popular sensibilities to have in a fantasy what we have in the real world? I read fantasy to get away from politically correct cliches. 


God, yes! If there’s one thing fantasy is just crawling with these days it’s widowed black middle-aged pirate moms. 

Real sea pirates could not be controlled by women, they were vicous rapits and murderers and I am sorry to say it was a man’s world. It is unrealistic wish fulfilment for you and your readers to have so many female pirates, especially if you want to be politically correct about it!

First, I will pretend that your last sentence makes sense because it will save us all time. Second, now you’re pissing me off. 

You know what? Yeah, Zamira Drakasha, middle-aged pirate mother of two, is a wish-fulfillment fantasy. I realized this as she was evolving on the page, and you know what? I fucking embrace it. 

Why shouldn’t middle-aged mothers get a wish-fulfillment character, you sad little bigot? Everyone else does. H.L. Mencken once wrote that “Every normal man must be tempted at times to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin slitting throats.” I can’t think of anyone to whom that applies more than my own mom, and the mothers on my friends list, with the incredible demands on time and spirit they face in their efforts to raise their kids, preserve their families, and save their own identity/sanity into the bargain. 

Shit yes, Zamira Drakasha, leaping across the gap between burning ships with twin sabers in hand to kick in some fucking heads and sail off into the sunset with her toddlers in her arms and a hold full of plundered goods, is a wish-fulfillment fantasy from hell. I offer her up on a silver platter with a fucking bow on top; I hope she amuses and delights. In my fictional world, opportunities for butt-kicking do not cease merely because one isn’t a beautiful teenager or a muscle-wrapped font of testosterone. In my fictional universe, the main characters are a fat ugly guy and a skinny forgettable guy, with a supporting cast that includes “SBF, 41, nonsmoker, 2 children, buccaneer of no fixed abode, seeks unescorted merchant for light boarding, heavy plunder.”

You don’t like it? Don’t buy my books. Get your own fictional universe. Your cabbage-water vision of worldbuilding bores me to tears. 

As for the “man’s world” thing, religious sentiments and gender prejudices flow differently in this fictional world. Women are regarded as luckier, better sailors than men. It’s regarded as folly for a ship to put to sea without at least one female officer; there are several all-female naval military traditions dating back centuries, and Drakasha comes from one of them. As for claims to “realism,” your complaint is of a kind with those from bigoted hand-wringers who whine that women can’t possibly fly combat aircraft, command naval vessels, serve in infantry actions, work as firefighters, police officers, etc. despite the fact that they do all of those things— and are, for a certainty, doing them all somewhere at this very minute. Tell me that a fit fortyish woman with 25+ years of experience at sea and several decades of live bladefighting practice under her belt isn’t a threat when she runs across the deck toward you, and I’ll tell you something in return— you’re gonna die of stab wounds.

What you’re really complaining about isn’t the fact that my fiction violates some objective “reality,” but rather that it impinges upon your sad, dull little conception of how the world works. I’m not beholden to the confirmation of your prejudices; to be perfectly frank, the prospect of confining the female characters in my story to placid, helpless secondary places in the narrative is so goddamn boring that I would rather not write at all. I’m not writing history, I’m writing speculative fiction. Nobody’s going to force you to buy it. Conversely, you’re cracked if you think you can persuade me not to write about what amuses and excites me in deference to your vision, because your vision fucking sucks.

I do not expect to change your mind but i hope that you will at least consider that I and others will not be buying your work because of these issues. I have been reading science fiction and fantasy for years and i know that I speak for a great many people. I hope you might stop to think about the sales you will lose because you want to bring your political corectness and foul language into fantasy. if we wanted those things we could go to the movies. Think about this! 

Thank you for your sentiments. I offer you in exchange this engraved invitation to go piss up a hill, suitable for framing.

Dude. I bounced off his first book in that series, but that character MIGHT just convince me to give it another try.

Also, Anne Bonny, Mary Read, Ching Shih, the Red Lady, Lai Sho Sz’en, Grace O’Malley, Sayyida al Hurra, the Lioness of Brittany, Mary Killigrew, Lo Hon-cho, and quite a few others.

LADY PIRATES REPRESENT.

This guy is such a patriarchal bigot that he actually wrote to Scott Lynch because he thinks all fictional worlds should be sexist and racist too. Lynch’s response was perfect.

image

Jul 17 '14
"We think of men as antiheroes, as capable of occupying an intense and fascinating moral grey area; of being able to fall, and rise, and fall again, but still be worthy of love on some fundamental level, because if it was the world and its failings that broke them, then we surely must owe them some sympathy. But women aren’t allowed to be broken by the world; or if we are, it’s the breaking that makes us villains. Wronged women turn into avenging furies, inhuman and monstrous: once we cross to the dark side, we become adversaries to be defeated, not lost souls in need of mending. Which is what happens, when you let benevolent sexism invest you in the idea that women are humanity’s moral guardians and men its native renegades: because if female goodness is only ever an inherent quality – something we’re born both with and to be – then once lost, it must necessarily be lost forever, a severed limb we can’t regrow. Whereas male goodness, by virtue of being an acquired quality – something bestowed through the kindness of women, earned through right action or learned through struggle – can just as necessarily be gained and lost multiple times without being tarnished, like a jewel we might pawn in hardship, and later reclaim."

Foz Meadows (Gender, Orphan Black & The Meta of Meta)

Look at your stories - don’t just count who gets to be the hero and the villain (what kind of hero? what kind of villain?); count who gets the redemption arcs. (via notsosilentsister)

#the backlash against the female antiheroes is the profoundest kind of disingenuous bullshit #’why do we want our women to be cruel to be selfish to be ungentle? why do we want to VALORIZE that?’ #we don’t #we want truth we want humanity in all its facets #women allowed the moral spectrum we don’t even evaluate when looking at male characters because we so entirely take it for granted #so many women and such different women that we stop ranking them by their virtues #and how comfortable/uncomfortable they make us #different women IN THE SAME STORIES even #imagine. (hotelsongs)

Jul 13 '14
"Apparently, women of color were wearing their hair in such fabulous ways, adding jewels and feathers to their high hairdos and walking around with such beauty and pride that it was obscuring their status. This was very threatening to the social stability (read: white population) of the area at the time. The law was meant to distinguish women of color from their white counterparts and to minimize their beauty."
Jul 5 '14
"For those of you who think that radical feminists exaggerate or cherry-pick the worst of the porn industry, I have an experiment for you. Type ‘porn’ into Google and click around the most well-travelled websites that appear. With mind-numbing repetition you will see gagging, slapping, verbal abuse, hair-pulling, pounding anal sex, women smeared in semen, sore anuses and vaginas, distended mouths, and more exhausted, depleted and shell-shocked women than you can count. You will not see two people having sex; you will see images depicting a level of physical cruelty that would not be out of place in an Amnesty International campaign.

One of the only studies of contemporary pornographic content found that the majority of scenes from fifty of the top-rented porn movies contained both physical and verbal abuse targeted against the female performers. Physical aggression – including spanking, open-hand slapping and gagging – occurred in over 88% of scenes, while expressions of verbal aggression – calling the woman names such as ‘bitch’ or ‘slut’ – were found in 48%. The researchers concluded that ‘if we combine both physical and verbal aggression, our findings indicate that nearly 90 per cent of scenes contained at least one aggressive act, with an average of nearly twelve acts of aggression per scene’. [x]

That this is the major form of sex education for men should be taken very seriously by the women’s movement. The same men who get off from women being brutalised and called cunts, sluts and cum-dumpsters are the ones who go on to become politicians, corporate executives, judges, media professionals, policy makers and bankers. In other words, they become the economic and cultural elite that shape the material and ideological world that determines how women – and their children – will live. Most of them will become partners and fathers. To assume that porn is mere fantasy and does not impact on the way men think and feel is to ignore decades of research on how images frame our social construction of reality."