Install Theme

Your web-browser is very outdated, and as such, this website may not display properly. Please consider upgrading to a modern, faster and more secure browser. Click here to do so.

BRAND X

Orphaned transracial international ungrateful insurgent Class Bastard.

Posts tagged eating the other

Jul 23 '14
fanufactured:

rootworkn:

museumartblog:

museumartblog:

My dreads a few months ago. They changed fast.

Calm down guys. It’s just a picture of new dreads and loose hair. It takes a while to lock up. It’s a process.

Your blatent cultural appropriation and disrespect now has your hair looking like a fucking rats nest with pencils and dust bunnies in it.
You got an ask telling you what the problem is, and you ignored it- classic caught white girl. “Its just a hairstyle I like!”
That shit is not doing it.

Reblogging this to explain why there are people of color upset about this hideous, hideous display:
I am a man of color who wears locs. My hair has been loc’d since 2005. It is clean, I maintain it monthly, moisturize it weekly and wash it as needed (this can be multiple times a month if I’m feeling athletic and trying to get my fitness on). It is loc’d to the root. I went through the early loc’ing phase when I was in college but AT NO POINT did it look dirty, unclean or unwashed.
DAILY I have people who try to connect the dots between my hair and my race and use that against me. I have people (COWORKERS) who’ve thought I was a drug dealer (I barely drink) and have people who classify me as a thug because of the way I wear the hair God gave me.
People (white) who come up to me and tell me how they”dreaded their hair for a few months but cut it out because it was so dirty, you know what I mean?” I wear my hair pulled back in a neat ponytail 97% of the time because I know all this hair makes white people nervous. Imagine if everytime someone saw you they assumed you were dirty, simply because they tried to do something you did (locs) and failed because their hair texture wasn’t correct, and instead of realizing that maybe it was just their situation, they’ve decided to apply that to everyone they meet.
And this nasty, unwashed young woman who feels the need to rebel against something (probably a shower) is sitting up proclaiming to the world that she has locs?
White privilege at work. Not only would I be unemployed if I had the audacity to traipse into my job looking like the inside of a drain, but I would immediately be classified as more of a thug than people already THINK I AM.
That’s why we’re upset. Black women can’t even wear their hair the way it grows out of their heads without it being a national scandal, yet this unwashed, unclean, clearly disturbed individual whose friends obviously have not informed her of the error of her ways will walk out in public and people will not only accept her, they will applaud her for being so different and unique.
Women like this are DIRECTLY affecting my life in that almost everyone I encounter has a friend or a cousin who is her and has given an entire LEGION of people a bad rap.
This is why cultural appropriation is harmful: when we do something and excel at it, are professional about it, look good doing it, it’s worthless. But throw it on a white body doing it the most lazy, bastardized, mediocre way ever and suddenly not only is it OK, it’s amazing! And so much better! 
*PS It really does look horrible. 

I’ve seen better looking hair in a shower drain. [lolwhitepeople.gif]

fanufactured:

rootworkn:

museumartblog:

museumartblog:

My dreads a few months ago. They changed fast.

Calm down guys. It’s just a picture of new dreads and loose hair. It takes a while to lock up. It’s a process.

Your blatent cultural appropriation and disrespect now has your hair looking like a fucking rats nest with pencils and dust bunnies in it.

You got an ask telling you what the problem is, and you ignored it- classic caught white girl. “Its just a hairstyle I like!”

That shit is not doing it.

Reblogging this to explain why there are people of color upset about this hideous, hideous display:

I am a man of color who wears locs. My hair has been loc’d since 2005. It is clean, I maintain it monthly, moisturize it weekly and wash it as needed (this can be multiple times a month if I’m feeling athletic and trying to get my fitness on). It is loc’d to the root. I went through the early loc’ing phase when I was in college but AT NO POINT did it look dirty, unclean or unwashed.

DAILY I have people who try to connect the dots between my hair and my race and use that against me. I have people (COWORKERS) who’ve thought I was a drug dealer (I barely drink) and have people who classify me as a thug because of the way I wear the hair God gave me.

People (white) who come up to me and tell me how they”dreaded their hair for a few months but cut it out because it was so dirty, you know what I mean?” I wear my hair pulled back in a neat ponytail 97% of the time because I know all this hair makes white people nervous. Imagine if everytime someone saw you they assumed you were dirty, simply because they tried to do something you did (locs) and failed because their hair texture wasn’t correct, and instead of realizing that maybe it was just their situation, they’ve decided to apply that to everyone they meet.

And this nasty, unwashed young woman who feels the need to rebel against something (probably a shower) is sitting up proclaiming to the world that she has locs?

White privilege at work. Not only would I be unemployed if I had the audacity to traipse into my job looking like the inside of a drain, but I would immediately be classified as more of a thug than people already THINK I AM.

That’s why we’re upset. Black women can’t even wear their hair the way it grows out of their heads without it being a national scandal, yet this unwashed, unclean, clearly disturbed individual whose friends obviously have not informed her of the error of her ways will walk out in public and people will not only accept her, they will applaud her for being so different and unique.

Women like this are DIRECTLY affecting my life in that almost everyone I encounter has a friend or a cousin who is her and has given an entire LEGION of people a bad rap.

This is why cultural appropriation is harmful: when we do something and excel at it, are professional about it, look good doing it, it’s worthless. But throw it on a white body doing it the most lazy, bastardized, mediocre way ever and suddenly not only is it OK, it’s amazing! And so much better! 

*PS It really does look horrible. 

I’ve seen better looking hair in a shower drain.
[lolwhitepeople.gif]

Jul 15 '14

visualize-materialize:

tashabilities:

dragaljubavi:

carry-on-my-wayward-butt:

White People Not Getting The Point: A Channel 4 Special (2009)

A documentary special on Jane Elliot and her exercise in teaching 30 adults in the United Kingdom about racism in society, and people who absolutely refused to grasp the point.

these are great examples of white people who do not want to unlearn racism.

they do not want to battle against their white supremacy. they are comfortable being the powers of society. they are comfortable being perpetrators. they are uncomfortable being exposed to their racism. they do not want people of color to feel victims for their differences. but at the same time, they want to be victims, too. hmpf.

the school teacher scared me the most. she was most hardcore about maintaining and defending her racism. and she teaches children! yikes.

This is 99% of white people.

They do this shit on purpose, which is why I’m NEVER talking to them.

I was scrolling through my dash, read this and liked it; carried on thinking a reblog wasn’t necessary given the content of most of the blogs I follow here—I was wrong.

I’ve noticed (for some time now ) that a lot of people who run blogs of the “spirituality/peaceloveunity/new-age/cosmos/positivity” ilk are either entirely delusional or oblivious of their privileged.  Not surprising as most of said blogs are run by white people; some who festishize Eastern cultures; others who legitimately have an interest the in the religions/philosophies; even those who post with the intention of highlighting our unifying human condition via optimistic quotes. 

Despite their intentions I always find myself hovering over the “unfollow” button or rolling my eyes at whatever it is they’re unwittingly espousing. Below are two screen caps: one that I saw a few posts below this one, that caused me to write this post; and the second is an excerpt of Q&A from a very popular Eastern philosophy inspired blog. 


Note the tags and couple it with the commentary

Much like in the video, people who don’t experience racism refuse to see it even when it’s right in front of them. The explanation provided is in itself an assumption. Price difference in dark and light skinned dolls is not isolated to this incident; even the most cursory search can corroborate this.


Way to sidestep what could've been a great teaching experience

I get that this blog is all about trying to help people see things through a different scope. Most people who have taken an intro course to Eastern philosophies “gets” what LazyYogi is trying to do here. But at the same time it sidesteps a perfectly good opportunity to truly open peoples eyes to the actual/factual going-ons known as white privilege.
Again, like in the video, this response is turning it on the person calling out the privilege “This must be the reason for your distrust of any who discriminate in terms of such things.” 

Watch the video provided in the original post, look at those screen caps, read the commentary in this thread.

I’m not saying that these people are inherently bad people, just using them as examples as to how blind people are to this sort of thing. Even people who run blogs of the aforementioned nature have some of the same mentalities as those in the video.

Jul 11 '14
  • Mom: *says something racist*
  • Me: Mom that's racist.
  • Mom: How could I possibly be racist?! I have a Korean son and an African-American daughter!!!!
  • Me: *internalize the pain, internalize the exasperation, internalize the rage, internalize everything* Okay mom.
Jul 6 '14
"In his preface to Fanon’s Wretched of the Earth, Jean-Paul Sartre wrote “the European has only been able to become a man through creating slaves and monsters” Black people have served as a kind of mirror to whites, but not one that gives a true image: more like a warped, polished surface that provides a distorted representation.

Much of whites’ self-image has been constructed as a response to what they believe Blacks are not. If whites understand themselves to be superior, intellectually and culturally, then images of Blacks have signified ignorance and barbarity. It has been vital to maintain those reflections, no matter how hideously inaccurate. […] Black people, especially those conspicuously engaged in entertainment, have been reminders to whites of what they are not. As we noted in the first chapter, the very category of whiteness was invented in counterposition to Blackness. In simple terms, without Black people, there were no whites; no “others,”, no “us.”"
Ellis Cashmore, The Black Culture Industry (via wretchedoftheearth)
Jun 25 '14
pleasedotheneedful:

socimages:

#intagrammingafrica: The narcissism of global voluntourism.
By Lauren Kascak with Sayantani DasGupta PhD
An article in The Onion mocks voluntourism, joking that a 6-day visit to a rural African village can “completely change a woman’s facebook profile picture.”  The article quotes “22-year old Angela Fisher” who says:

I don’t think my profile photo will ever be the same, not after the experience of taking such incredible pictures with my arms around those small African children’s shoulders.

It goes on to say that Fisher “has been encouraging every one of her friends to visit Africa, promising that it would change their Facebook profile photos as well.”
I was once Angela Fisher. But I’m not any more.
***
I have participated in not one but three separate, and increasingly disillusioning, international health brigades, short-term visits to developing countries that involve bringing health care to struggling populations.
Such trips – critically called voluntourism — are a booming business, even though they do very little advertising and charge people thousands of dollars to participate.
How do they attract so many paying volunteers?
Photography is a big part of the answer.  Voluntourism organizations don’t have to advertise, because they can crowdsource.  Photography – particularly the habit of taking and posting selfies with local children – is a central component of the voluntourism experience. Hashtags like #InstagrammingAfrica are popular with students on international health brigades, as are #medicalbrigades, #globalhealth, and of course the nostalgic-for-the-good-days hashtag #takemeback.
It was the photographs posted by other students that inspired me to go on my first overseas medical mission. When classmates uploaded the experience of themselves wearing scrubs beside adorable children in developing countries, I believed I was missing out on a pivotal pre-med experience. I took over 200 photos on my first international volunteer mission. I modeled those I had seen on Facebook and even premeditated photo opportunities to acquire the “perfect” image that would receive the most “likes.”
Over time, I felt increasingly uncomfortable with the ethics of those photographs, and ultimately left my camera at home. Now, as an insider, I see three common types of photographs voluntourists share through social media: The Suffering Other, The Self-Directed Samaritan, and The Overseas Selfie.
The Suffering Other
In a photograph taken by a fellow voluntourist in Ghana (not shown), a child stands isolated with her bare feet digging in the dirt. Her hands pull up her shirt to expose an umbilical hernia, distended belly, and a pair of too-big underwear. Her face is uncertain and her scalp shows evidence of dermatological pathology or a nutritional deficiency—maybe both. Behind her, only weeds grow.
Anthropologists Arthur and Joan Kleinman note that images of distant, suffering women and children suggest there are communities incapable of or uninterested in caring for its own people. These photographs justify colonialist, paternalistic attitudes and policies, suggesting that the individual in the photograph…

…must be protected, as well as represented, by others. The image of the subaltern conjures up an almost neocolonial ideology of failure, inadequacy, passivity, fatalism, and inevitability. Something must be done, and it must be done soon, but from outside the local setting. The authorization of action through an appeal for foreign aid, even foreign intervention, begins with an evocation of indigenous absence, an erasure of local voices and acts.

The Self-directed Samaritan
Above we have a smiling young white girl with a French braid, medical scrubs, and a well-intentioned smile. This young lady is the centerpiece of the photo; she is its protagonist. Her scrubs suggest that she is doing important work among those who are so poor, so vulnerable, and so Other.
The girl is me. And the photograph was taken on my first trip to Ghana during a 10 day medical brigade. I’m beaming in the photograph, half towering and half hovering over these children. I do not know their names, they do not know my name, but I directed a friend to capture this moment with my own camera. Why?
This photograph is less about doing actual work and more about retrospectively appearing to have had a positive impact overseas. Photographs like these represent the overseas experience in accordance with what writer Teju Cole calls the “White Savior Industrial Complex.”
Moreover, in directing, capturing, and performing in photos such as these, voluntourists prevent themselves from actually engaging with the others in the photo. In On Photography, Susan Sontag reminds us:

Photography has become almost as widely practiced an amusement as sex and dancing – which means that…it is mainly a social rite, a defense against anxiety, and a tool of power.

On these trips, we hide behind the lens, consuming the world around us with our powerful gazes and the clicking of camera shutters. When I directed this photo opportunity and starred in it, I used my privilege to capture a photograph that made me feel as though I was engaging with the community. Only now do I realize that what I was actually doing was making myself the hero/star in a story about “suffering Africa.”
The Overseas Selfie

(Photo obtained from Global Brigades.)
In his New York Times Op-Ed, that modern champion of the selfie James Franco wrote:

Selfies are avatars: Mini-Me’s that we send out to give others a sense of who we are … In our age of social networking, the selfie is the new way to look someone right in the eye and say, “Hello, this is me.”

Although related to the Self-Directed Samaritan shot, there’s something extra-insidious about this type of super-close range photo. “Hello, this is me” takes on new meaning – there is only one subject in this photo, the white subject. Capturing this image and posting it on the internet is to understand the Other not as a separate person who exists in the context of their own family or community but rather, as a prop, an extra, someone only intelligible in relation to the Western volunteer.
***
Voluntourism is ultimately about the fulfillment of the volunteers themselves, not necessarily what they bring to the communities they visit. In fact, medical volunteerism often breaks down existing local health systems. In Ghana, I realized that that local people weren’t purchasing health insurance, since they knew there would be free foreign health care and medications available every few months. This left them vulnerable in the intervening times, not to mention when the organization would leave the community.
In the end, the Africa we voluntourists photograph isn’t a real place at all. It is an imaginary geography whose landscapes are forged by colonialism, as well as a good deal of narcissism. I hope my fellow students think critically about what they are doing and why before they sign up for a short-term global volunteer experience. And if they do go, it is my hope that they might think with some degree of narrative humility about how to de-center themselves from the Western savior narrative. Most importantly, I hope they leave their iphones at home.
Lauren Kascak is a graduate of the Masters Program in Narrative Medicine at Columbia University, where Sayantani DasGupta is a faculty member.  DasGupta is the editor of Stories of Illness and Healing and the author of The Demon Slayers and Other Stories and Her Own Medicine.

Totally. I get that volunteerism isn’t totally altruistic but I often see people take it to a level that comes off as totally disingenuous. Several years ago I probably would’ve been guilty of the same.
Also worthwhile to investigate candidate mission organizations and see what kind of long-term impact their work has on the local community… as touched on here, some end up doing more harm than good.

To name just one example: Child Trafficking “Orphan” Trade in Nepal Directly Fueled by Voluntourism
Because who gives a fuck about white peoples’ narratives &/ motivations really. The most salient point is that white voluntourism not only corrupts local infrastructure (a fact barely referenced and only by the end of the piece), but actively destroys the lives of non-Western people, then expects the survivors (most often children of color) to be grateful.

pleasedotheneedful:

socimages:

#intagrammingafrica: The narcissism of global voluntourism.

By Lauren Kascak with Sayantani DasGupta PhD

An article in The Onion mocks voluntourism, joking that a 6-day visit to a rural African village can “completely change a woman’s facebook profile picture.”  The article quotes “22-year old Angela Fisher” who says:

I don’t think my profile photo will ever be the same, not after the experience of taking such incredible pictures with my arms around those small African children’s shoulders.

It goes on to say that Fisher “has been encouraging every one of her friends to visit Africa, promising that it would change their Facebook profile photos as well.”

I was once Angela Fisher. But I’m not any more.

***

I have participated in not one but three separate, and increasingly disillusioning, international health brigades, short-term visits to developing countries that involve bringing health care to struggling populations.

Such trips – critically called voluntourism — are a booming business, even though they do very little advertising and charge people thousands of dollars to participate.

How do they attract so many paying volunteers?

Photography is a big part of the answer.  Voluntourism organizations don’t have to advertise, because they can crowdsource.  Photography – particularly the habit of taking and posting selfies with local children – is a central component of the voluntourism experience. Hashtags like #InstagrammingAfrica are popular with students on international health brigades, as are #medicalbrigades, #globalhealth, and of course the nostalgic-for-the-good-days hashtag #takemeback.

It was the photographs posted by other students that inspired me to go on my first overseas medical mission. When classmates uploaded the experience of themselves wearing scrubs beside adorable children in developing countries, I believed I was missing out on a pivotal pre-med experience. I took over 200 photos on my first international volunteer mission. I modeled those I had seen on Facebook and even premeditated photo opportunities to acquire the “perfect” image that would receive the most “likes.”

Over time, I felt increasingly uncomfortable with the ethics of those photographs, and ultimately left my camera at home. Now, as an insider, I see three common types of photographs voluntourists share through social media: The Suffering Other, The Self-Directed Samaritan, and The Overseas Selfie.

The Suffering Other

In a photograph taken by a fellow voluntourist in Ghana (not shown), a child stands isolated with her bare feet digging in the dirt. Her hands pull up her shirt to expose an umbilical hernia, distended belly, and a pair of too-big underwear. Her face is uncertain and her scalp shows evidence of dermatological pathology or a nutritional deficiency—maybe both. Behind her, only weeds grow.

Anthropologists Arthur and Joan Kleinman note that images of distant, suffering women and children suggest there are communities incapable of or uninterested in caring for its own people. These photographs justify colonialist, paternalistic attitudes and policies, suggesting that the individual in the photograph…

…must be protected, as well as represented, by others. The image of the subaltern conjures up an almost neocolonial ideology of failure, inadequacy, passivity, fatalism, and inevitability. Something must be done, and it must be done soon, but from outside the local setting. The authorization of action through an appeal for foreign aid, even foreign intervention, begins with an evocation of indigenous absence, an erasure of local voices and acts.

The Self-directed Samaritan

Above we have a smiling young white girl with a French braid, medical scrubs, and a well-intentioned smile. This young lady is the centerpiece of the photo; she is its protagonist. Her scrubs suggest that she is doing important work among those who are so poor, so vulnerable, and so Other.

The girl is me. And the photograph was taken on my first trip to Ghana during a 10 day medical brigade. I’m beaming in the photograph, half towering and half hovering over these children. I do not know their names, they do not know my name, but I directed a friend to capture this moment with my own camera. Why?

This photograph is less about doing actual work and more about retrospectively appearing to have had a positive impact overseas. Photographs like these represent the overseas experience in accordance with what writer Teju Cole calls the “White Savior Industrial Complex.”

Moreover, in directing, capturing, and performing in photos such as these, voluntourists prevent themselves from actually engaging with the others in the photo. In On PhotographySusan Sontag reminds us:

Photography has become almost as widely practiced an amusement as sex and dancing – which means that…it is mainly a social rite, a defense against anxiety, and a tool of power.

On these trips, we hide behind the lens, consuming the world around us with our powerful gazes and the clicking of camera shutters. When I directed this photo opportunity and starred in it, I used my privilege to capture a photograph that made me feel as though I was engaging with the community. Only now do I realize that what I was actually doing was making myself the hero/star in a story about “suffering Africa.”

The Overseas Selfie

1 (2)

(Photo obtained from Global Brigades.)

In his New York Times Op-Ed, that modern champion of the selfie James Franco wrote:

Selfies are avatars: Mini-Me’s that we send out to give others a sense of who we are … In our age of social networking, the selfie is the new way to look someone right in the eye and say, “Hello, this is me.”

Although related to the Self-Directed Samaritan shot, there’s something extra-insidious about this type of super-close range photo. “Hello, this is me” takes on new meaning – there is only one subject in this photo, the white subject. Capturing this image and posting it on the internet is to understand the Other not as a separate person who exists in the context of their own family or community but rather, as a prop, an extra, someone only intelligible in relation to the Western volunteer.

***

Voluntourism is ultimately about the fulfillment of the volunteers themselves, not necessarily what they bring to the communities they visit. In fact, medical volunteerism often breaks down existing local health systems. In Ghana, I realized that that local people weren’t purchasing health insurance, since they knew there would be free foreign health care and medications available every few months. This left them vulnerable in the intervening times, not to mention when the organization would leave the community.

In the end, the Africa we voluntourists photograph isn’t a real place at all. It is an imaginary geography whose landscapes are forged by colonialism, as well as a good deal of narcissism. I hope my fellow students think critically about what they are doing and why before they sign up for a short-term global volunteer experience. And if they do go, it is my hope that they might think with some degree of narrative humility about how to de-center themselves from the Western savior narrative. Most importantly, I hope they leave their iphones at home.

Lauren Kascak is a graduate of the Masters Program in Narrative Medicine at Columbia University, where Sayantani DasGupta is a faculty member.  DasGupta is the editor of Stories of Illness and Healing and the author of The Demon Slayers and Other Stories and Her Own Medicine.

Totally. I get that volunteerism isn’t totally altruistic but I often see people take it to a level that comes off as totally disingenuous. Several years ago I probably would’ve been guilty of the same.

Also worthwhile to investigate candidate mission organizations and see what kind of long-term impact their work has on the local community… as touched on here, some end up doing more harm than good.

To name just one example: Child Trafficking “Orphan” Trade in Nepal Directly Fueled by Voluntourism

Because who gives a fuck about white peoples’ narratives &/ motivations really. The most salient point is that white voluntourism not only corrupts local infrastructure (a fact barely referenced and only by the end of the piece), but actively destroys the lives of non-Western people, then expects the survivors (most often children of color) to be grateful.

Jun 25 '14

collegehumor:

"Columbusing" Perfectly Describes Something All White People Do

"…so the next time someone credits Miley Cyrus for twerking, you’ll be ready."

Jun 12 '14

amazing-how-you-love:

All my life white people have been making fun of me for meditating, doing yoga, and then practicing acupuncture. Now that there’s yoga mats they have no problem telling me my problem is I need to do yoga, meditate, and try acupuncture.

May 30 '14
May 30 '14

irresistible-revolution:

I feel some kind of way about all these white women writing poems and posts about “feminist dragons” and “monstrous femininity” without

a) acknowledging how Black women have been writing and theorizing and making art about these concepts for a long ass time

b) recognizing the intersection of race and sexuality on which all womanhood and femininity hinges

c) considering the role of colonialism in crushing (and now usurping) the myths of sacred feminine power and/or monster women in various non-Euro cultures

d) bothering to nod at the “Dragon Lady” stereotype that’s been deployed against East Asian women to strip them of humanity and agency

e) thinking about why it’s so easy for white women to give up princesshood for dragonhood when a lot of us weren’t given a choice

basically, this is all in the vein of “weaponized femininity” and the other feminist catchphrases that white women both on and off tumblr pretend to have pulled out of thin air with no sense of accountability or history. smh.

May 30 '14
marauderful:

windypicnic:

caprediem:

banditblossom:

caprediem:

arari:

sarahjhuynh:

amazing-how-you-love:

koreaunderground:

Brazilian man goes under the knife to look Korean [x]

Why are white people so obsessed with plastic surgery! They are so shallow! Somebody tell them their pasty skin is fine looking like unbaked rolls.

…………………

I would say boiled octopus, but really. WTF????

………………

So I found the article here. (just to let you know it’s all in Portuguese BT)
From what I’ve read is that the guy literally wanted to “look Oriental”. He literally got a bunch of operation on his to look east Asian.
Also another thing too add, is that there is a quote from his parents that says he would use a lot of eye make up to make his eyes “slanted” so yeah he basically yellowed face. Which is extreamly racist. I mean Japanese Brazilians face a lot of racism in Brazil and are forced to assimilate (along with other east asians as well). And being a white Brazilian in Brazil comes with a hell lot of privilege.

Ugh, god. There are a good deal of Koreans in certain area of Brazil and omg yes being that pale in Brazil would earn you a lot of privilege from what I learned. God so gross. Basically he yellowfaced and now with these surgeries it’s permanent yellow facing wtf

OMG this is so wrong. i found his ask.fm and people call him “oppa” and he tells people to call him “oppa” (well from google translate it seems)
and he did this in a vid response

here’s the link to that
he says something in portuguese? and says in korean “I am a korean person (formal speach). Really. (informal)” while pulling his eyes back!?? that he already surgically altered to become a permanent display of yellowface?!!
i went looking for him to see what kind of feedback he’d be getting from ppl but it seems like he lives in his own world with fans!!? i am so disgusted i can’t believe this is real and at the same time it’s not surprising

The gist of the comments he seems to be getting and replying to all involve K-pop. (Interestingly enough in that creepy sort of way, he states that before the surgery, he tried to recreate Yellowface with the use of image editing programs such as Photoshop. So I daresay this has been going on for quite a while!)
In all, it doesn’t take much to link two and two together by this point: this is what romanticizing an entire nation and it’s pop culture can lead too. When you glorify a nation and cuddle it’s pretty points while instantaneously pushing the bad out of sheer convenience is a mere mockery to the country itself — how does one “learn” about a nation that way?

marauderful:

windypicnic:

caprediem:

banditblossom:

caprediem:

arari:

sarahjhuynh:

amazing-how-you-love:

koreaunderground:

Brazilian man goes under the knife to look Korean [x]

Why are white people so obsessed with plastic surgery! They are so shallow! Somebody tell them their pasty skin is fine looking like unbaked rolls.

…………………

I would say boiled octopus, but really. WTF????

………………

So I found the article here. (just to let you know it’s all in Portuguese BT)

From what I’ve read is that the guy literally wanted to “look Oriental”. He literally got a bunch of operation on his to look east Asian.

Also another thing too add, is that there is a quote from his parents that says he would use a lot of eye make up to make his eyes “slanted” so yeah he basically yellowed face. Which is extreamly racist. I mean Japanese Brazilians face a lot of racism in Brazil and are forced to assimilate (along with other east asians as well). And being a white Brazilian in Brazil comes with a hell lot of privilege.

Ugh, god. There are a good deal of Koreans in certain area of Brazil and omg yes being that pale in Brazil would earn you a lot of privilege from what I learned. God so gross. Basically he yellowfaced and now with these surgeries it’s permanent yellow facing wtf

OMG this is so wrong. i found his ask.fm and people call him “oppa” and he tells people to call him “oppa” (well from google translate it seems)

and he did this in a vid response

image

here’s the link to that

he says something in portuguese? and says in korean “I am a korean person (formal speach). Really. (informal)” while pulling his eyes back!?? that he already surgically altered to become a permanent display of yellowface?!!

i went looking for him to see what kind of feedback he’d be getting from ppl but it seems like he lives in his own world with fans!!? i am so disgusted i can’t believe this is real and at the same time it’s not surprising

The gist of the comments he seems to be getting and replying to all involve K-pop. (Interestingly enough in that creepy sort of way, he states that before the surgery, he tried to recreate Yellowface with the use of image editing programs such as Photoshop. So I daresay this has been going on for quite a while!)

In all, it doesn’t take much to link two and two together by this point: this is what romanticizing an entire nation and it’s pop culture can lead too. When you glorify a nation and cuddle it’s pretty points while instantaneously pushing the bad out of sheer convenience is a mere mockery to the country itself — how does one “learn” about a nation that way?