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BRAND X

Orphaned transracial international ungrateful insurgent Class Bastard.

Posts tagged eating the other

Apr 6 '14
thetrillestqueen:

obesityrehab:

why touch her hair though? Dammit…

Reason number 45-60754280865’11B I won’t go on a mission trip.

p.s. African children were put into human petting zoos throughout Europe and America.

thetrillestqueen:

obesityrehab:

why touch her hair though? Dammit…

Reason number 45-60754280865’11B I won’t go on a mission trip.

p.s. African children were put into human petting zoos throughout Europe and America.

(Source: and--lo)

Apr 6 '14
"You’re drunk in a bathtub
with a red cup full of Birthday Cake flavored vodka
wearing a headdress
made of neon Dollar Store chicken feathers.
You’re half naked in a grassy field
with drugstore lipstick smeared under your eyes
dropping acid
and wearing moccasins from Urban Outfitters.
You can’t wait for Coachella
so you can finally smoke a peace pipe in a tepee
and find your Spirit Animal.
You think Native American culture is so beautiful
and clumsily show it with your
hashtags on tumblr and Instagram.
But when actual Indigenous people tell you that
Gypsy, Squaw and Red Injun are all racist slurs
Headdresses are sacred
and war paint on your white face is insulting
You say
“I’m just appreciating your beautiful culture!
I’m 1/16th Cherokee.”
Ignoring the fact that running around
naked in the woods on shrooms
will not connect you with any tribe
and that your great great great great grandmother
along with the rest of the Cherokee people
never wore headdresses."
"1/16th Cherokee" by sumblr (via calamityjaneporter)

(Source: ursulamisandress)

Apr 2 '14

sikssaapo-p:

z0mbat:

sikssaapo-p:

That idea that embracing your “Native American roots” by either wearing a fake indian headdress or stereotypical and often ignorant facial paint - says more about your “native roots”, meaning you don’t have any!

Hi my great grandmother was half Cherokee and I’m pretty sure she wouldn’t mind people wearing what they want. You shouldn’t have to justify your dress with ethnicity. Why is race still even an issue >_

Right on time

that Carefree White Girl(tm) is literally named Becky pahahahaa

Mar 22 '14

amazing-how-you-love:

navigatethestream:

dylandigits:

In which I try to explain to western Buddhists why unsourced photos of Black women aren’t fodder for promotion.

No one ever addresses my initial question: Who is this woman? Does she have a name?

How is any of this dehumanizing and universalizing consistent with the notion of “Creating Enlightened Society”?

i have a similar problem with a lot of the pages related to Sufi Muslim mystic quotes on facebook

usually the images are always associated with white people and i’m like

"sufism as a tradition developed in the predominately POC eastern world. so how is it that thousands of years later a quote by Rumi, Hafiz, or Inayat Hazrat Khan gets paired up with a picture of a white person?"

but this also encapusulates the issues i had with the “westernization” of buddhism as a teenager trying to learn more about the various lineages. the post-racializing of religious discourse by white folks to commit their same old everyday fuckery

When I moved out west, I was struck by how white people who used images of Asian women to advertise their business or practice treated actual Asian women.  I thought it was me until two other Asian women moved to town and I saw the same smear campaigns from grown women against teenagers fresh off the boat from China, the land that these white people claimed as their spiritual birthplace. 

White ppl: "Let’s take Buddhist philosophy from the exotic Orient, water it down in a self-aggrandizing New Age Facebook campaign, then slap on a stock photo of this conveniently nameless African Earth Mother as our mascot!!!11"

Mar 11 '14

Anonymous asked:

Is there anything wrong or culturally inappropriate of wanting to originate from another country? I dont feel as if I belong in any other place then Japan. I adore it's culture and it's history. But I'm afraid if I tell someone that they'll think I'm so type of anime freak, it's more then just that to me, I adore Japan for it's history and culture. Is there anything wrong with this?

thisisnotjapan:

YES. There is everything wrong with this and nothing right. Do not spend any mental energy trying to justify your obsession. It’s extremely unhealthy for yourself and others. 

Mar 11 '14
Mar 6 '14

atane:

the-uncensored-she:

redphilistine:

wonderous-world:

Born in Africa to French wildlife photographer parents, Tippi Degré had a most unusual childhood. The young girl grew up in the African desert and developed an uncommon bond with many untamed animals including a 28-year old African elephant named Abu, lion cubs, giraffes, an Ostrich, a mongoose, crocodiles, a baby zebra, a cheetah, giant bullfrogs, and even a snake. Africa was her home for many years and Tippi became friends with the ferocious animals and tribes people of Namibia. Parents Alain Degré and Sylvie Robert documented Tippi’s life and relationships with the African wildlife and transformed those moments into captivating books and movies. Tippi of Africa, published in 1998, told Tippi’s story of she and her parents. You can see more photos and videos here.

"Born in Africa" yes she was born on the entire continent all at once

"grew up in the African desert" there is only one desert in Africa and it doesn’t have a name, so everyone refers to it as the African desert

"Africa was her home" THE ENTIRE CONTINENT

"ferocious animals and tribes people of Namibia" ooh ferocious animals AND tribes people? how exotic! but at least we’ve nailed down a country

"African wildlife" she was besties with all the animals on the continent

"Tippi of Africa" i’m done

smdh. Oh white people…

This “Tippi of Africa” child has been making the rounds on facebook, and what I found revolting was how “cute” people thought the whole thing was. White people fawning over nonsense like this is no surprise. This type of Tarzan/George of the Jungle, Africa is the land of ferocious tribes and beasts appeals to white people who aren’t interested in understanding any aspect of Africa as a continent or the people in it. They prefer colonial fantasies full of wild, ferocious things which describe both the people and the creatures in their minds.

The rub is that no matter how fierce and ferocious those people and beasts are, they must yield to whiteness. Their ferociousness is tamed when whiteness invades their space. In fact, these wild creatures want nothing more than to bond with whiteness. Why even an African hunter is teaching the child his ferocious tactics in the bush, like he is imparting wisdom to the next generation. Naturally, Tippi is next in line to control the reins of the bush. Recognize the symbolism in that. It’s usually presented this way. These otherwise ferocious creatures all want to be friends with this white person who has invaded their space. No one asked Tippi to be there, but they are grateful for her presence. She enriched their otherwise savage lives by bonding with them. It is presented as sweet and endearing, when it is the height of exploitation. To someone with a colonialist mindset, this is cute and wholesome.

I’ve come to expect this type of thing from white people who take jaunts in Africa. Even when they intend to be respectful and reverential, they end up being paternalistic and they will fall back to reductive depictions of Africa because a reductive Africa works in their best interests. A multifaceted and nuanced Africa is of no benefit to them. White people won’t read a book about Tippi respecting Africans, her parents not referring to her as “Tippi of Africa”, and not referring to the specific place she was raised as the “the African Desert”, or putting the poor child in danger by raising her with wild animals. They want savages and wild animals. They always otherize Africa and Africans. When one thinks this way, Africa becomes a monolithic land mass, and they will say things like “the African Desert”, as if there is just one, or like it makes sense. That kind of statement can only be uttered by someone with a colonialist mindset.

If you produce work like “Tippi of Africa” or think this type of thing is in any way honorable, then you don’t respect Africans or recognize their full humanity. Africa and Africans are the playthings in this fantasy. Africa and all it entails is merely a backdrop for this child’s parents to carry out their colonialist fantasies via their child. Not only is it highly disrespectful to Africa and Africans, this whole ordeal is child abuse. Tippi didn’t come out of the womb asking to fraternize with wild animals. They put this little girl in grave danger. For what? Pictures? Books? Movies? They ought to be ashamed of using their child in this manner.

Mar 2 '14
descentintotyranny:

Through the 1950s, Africans and Native Americans Were Kept In Zoos As Exhibits
Feb. 13 2014
Throughout the late 19th century, and well into the 1950′s, Africans and in some cases Native Americans, were kept as exhibits in zoos. Far from a relic from an unenlightened past, remnants of such exhibits have continued in Europe as late as the 2000′s.

Throughout the early 20th century, Germany held what was termed a, “Peoples Show,” or Völkerschau. Africans were brought in as carnival or zoo exhibits for passers-by to gawk at.
Only decades before, in the late 1800′s, Europe had been filled with, “human zoos,” in cities like Paris, Hamburg, Antwerp, Barcelona, London, Milan, and Warsaw. New York too saw these popular exhibits continue into the 20th century. There was an average of 200,000 to 300,000 visitors who attended each exhibition in each city.
Carl Hagenbeck of Germany ran exhibits of what he called, “purely natural,” populations, usually East Asian Islanders, but in 1876, he also sent a collaborator to the Sudan to bring back, “wild beasts and Nubians.” The traveling Nubian exhibit was a huge success in cities like Paris, London, and Berlin.
The World’s Fair, in 1889 was visited by 28 million people, who lined up to see 400 indigenous people as the major attraction. The 1900 World’s Fair followed suit, as did the Colonial Exhibitions in Marseilles (1906 and 1922) and in Paris (1907 and 1931) which displayed naked or semi-naked humans in cages. Paris saw 34 million people attend their exhibition in six months alone.
Just four years shy of the 20th century, the Cincinnati Zoo kept one hundred Sioux Native Americans in a mock village at the zoo for three months.
Read More

descentintotyranny:

Through the 1950s, Africans and Native Americans Were Kept In Zoos As Exhibits

Feb. 13 2014

Throughout the late 19th century, and well into the 1950′s, Africans and in some cases Native Americans, were kept as exhibits in zoos. Far from a relic from an unenlightened past, remnants of such exhibits have continued in Europe as late as the 2000′s.

Throughout the early 20th century, Germany held what was termed a, “Peoples Show,” or Völkerschau. Africans were brought in as carnival or zoo exhibits for passers-by to gawk at.

Only decades before, in the late 1800′s, Europe had been filled with, “human zoos,” in cities like Paris, Hamburg, Antwerp, Barcelona, London, Milan, and Warsaw. New York too saw these popular exhibits continue into the 20th century. There was an average of 200,000 to 300,000 visitors who attended each exhibition in each city.

Carl Hagenbeck of Germany ran exhibits of what he called, “purely natural,” populations, usually East Asian Islanders, but in 1876, he also sent a collaborator to the Sudan to bring back, “wild beasts and Nubians.” The traveling Nubian exhibit was a huge success in cities like Paris, London, and Berlin.

The World’s Fair, in 1889 was visited by 28 million people, who lined up to see 400 indigenous people as the major attraction. The 1900 World’s Fair followed suit, as did the Colonial Exhibitions in Marseilles (1906 and 1922) and in Paris (1907 and 1931) which displayed naked or semi-naked humans in cages. Paris saw 34 million people attend their exhibition in six months alone.

Just four years shy of the 20th century, the Cincinnati Zoo kept one hundred Sioux Native Americans in a mock village at the zoo for three months.

Read More

Feb 26 '14
Feb 22 '14

STOP USING POC STYLES OF CLOTHING OR HAIR DRESSING TO ACCENTUATE YOUR ALIENS WHITE AUTHORS

moniquill:

willow-wanderings:

wintergrey:

moniquill:

washi:

moniquill:

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

ESPECIALLY WHEN THERE ARE NO GODDAMN POC HUMANS IN YOUR SPACE EPICS

#or your whitebread fantasy characters

Could you give me an example of this? I think I know what you’re talking about, but I’m not positive.

(Particularly what you mean by whitebread fantasy characters?)

http://irresistible-revolution.tumblr.com/post/69094155715/cultural-appropriation-star-wars-and-the-myths-of

Just for starters.
The principle is throwing clothing/hair/makeup/jewelry from POC cultures onto white characters to show how exotic/alien/different/desirable they are.

Good writing advice. Or character design advice.

Ok, I just want to check, I’m pretty sure I’ve got it but just to clarify. The point here is that nabbing random POC styles to use on white characters purely because they’re “way different and interesting” is really not ok and don’t fucking do it (and I really don’t want to because well, it’s not ok to do).

Now, when I’m writing (especially sci-fi where any of the races are originally from earth), I tend to look stuff up about other cultures and then use that knowledge to build characters on. So, yeah it’s 4,000 years in the future and we’re aboard a warp-capable ship half a galaxy away from earth, but I’ve still got a handful of characters with POC traits and styles because that’s part of their background.
Is that still the same problem? Do I need to change how I do that?

…why do they ‘have POC traits’ rather than just, yanno, BEING POC?

It’s ok to have characters that actually are/are descendants of the cultures you’re interested in portraying.