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BRAND X

Orphaned transracial international ungrateful insurgent Class Bastard.

Posts tagged decolonize

Aug 11 '14
"Women invented all the core technologies that made civilization possible. This isn’t some feminist myth; it’s what modern anthropologists believe. Women are thought to have invented pottery, basketmaking, weaving, textiles, horticulture, and agriculture. That’s right: without women’s inventions, we wouldn’t be able to carry things or store things or tie things up or go fishing or hunt with nets or haft a blade or wear clothes or grow our food or live in permanent settlements. Suck on that.

Women have continued to be involved in the creation and advancement of civilization throughout history, whether you know it or not. Pick anything—a technology, a science, an art form, a school of thought—and start digging into the background. You’ll find women there, I guarantee, making critical contributions and often inventing the damn shit in the first place.

Women have made those contributions in spite of astonishing hurdles. Hurdles like not being allowed to go to school. Hurdles like not being allowed to work in an office with men, or join a professional society, or walk on the street, or own property. Example: look up Lise Meitner some time. When she was born in 1878 it was illegal in Austria for girls to attend school past the age of 13. Once the laws finally eased up and she could go to university, she wasn’t allowed to study with the men. Then she got a research post but wasn’t allowed to use the lab on account of girl cooties. Her whole life was like this, but she still managed to discover nuclear fucking fission. Then the Nobel committee gave the prize to her junior male colleague and ignored her existence completely.

Men in all patriarchal civilizations, including ours, have worked to downplay or deny women’s creative contributions. That’s because patriarchy is founded on the belief that women are breeding stock and men are the only people who can think. The easiest way for men to erase women’s contributions is to simply ignore that they happened. Because when you ignore something, it gets forgotten. People in the next generation don’t hear about it, and so they grow up thinking that no women have ever done anything. And then when women in their generation do stuff, they think ‘it’s a fluke, never happened before in the history of the world, ignore it.’ And so they ignore it, and it gets forgotten. And on and on and on. The New York Times article is a perfect illustration of this principle in action.

Finally, and this is important: even those women who weren’t inventors and intellectuals, even those women who really did spend all their lives doing stereotypical “women’s work”—they also built this world. The mundane labor of life is what makes everything else possible. Before you can have scientists and engineers and artists, you have to have a whole bunch of people (and it’s usually women) to hold down the basics: to grow and harvest and cook the food, to provide clothes and shelter, to fetch the firewood and the water, to nurture and nurse, to tend and teach. Every single scrap of civilized inventing and dreaming and thinking rides on top of that foundation. Never forget that."
Violet Socks, Patriarchy in Action: The New York Times Rewrites History (via o1sv)

(Source: sendforbromina)

Aug 5 '14
"In one often repeated story, a Native American girl in Oklahoma raises her hand when the teacher asks, “Who here can speak a foreign language?” She replies: “I can. English,” incurring the teacher’s disapproval. Yet for her—indeed, for all Native Americans—English is a foreign language. The power of their native tongues has lingered all over the land, as shown in rivers such as the Chattahoochee, Monongahela, and Susquehanna. Rarely do newcomers rename rivers; they merely mangle the old pronunciation. For instance, in Ojibwe misi-ziibi means “Great River.”"
K. David Harrison, The Last Speakers (via fifthblackbird)

(Source: simhasanam)

Jul 22 '14
youngblackandvegan:

accras:

queensphynxe:

She just stared for the longest time.

OMG…I love this. This is important.

v important! representation matters more than words can express
but this picture about sums it up :)

youngblackandvegan:

accras:

queensphynxe:

She just stared for the longest time.

OMG…I love this. This is important.

v important! representation matters more than words can express

but this picture about sums it up :)

(Source: milasphynxe)

Jul 13 '14
jeromewaznice:

newblackschool:

ancestralvoices:

“Can you name one African God? How can you then define yourself, the very true essence of yourself and the very essence of your soul and organise the very nature of your life here on earth based on a god handed to us by our slave master and say that you have no slave consciousness?” Dr. Amos N. Wilson.
 Ancestral Voices: Esoteric African Knowledge
Website
FaceBook 
Twitter 

Food for Thought. 

I can name several. Still doesn’t invalidate what he’s saying….

jeromewaznice:

newblackschool:

ancestralvoices:

“Can you name one African God? How can you then define yourself, the very true essence of yourself and the very essence of your soul and organise the very nature of your life here on earth based on a god handed to us by our slave master and say that you have no slave consciousness?” Dr. Amos N. Wilson.

 Ancestral Voices: Esoteric African Knowledge

Website

FaceBook 

Twitter 

Food for Thought. 

I can name several. Still doesn’t invalidate what he’s saying….

Jul 13 '14
"Apparently, women of color were wearing their hair in such fabulous ways, adding jewels and feathers to their high hairdos and walking around with such beauty and pride that it was obscuring their status. This was very threatening to the social stability (read: white population) of the area at the time. The law was meant to distinguish women of color from their white counterparts and to minimize their beauty."
Jul 13 '14

soyeahso:

I love tumblr so much because it’s like “Here’s a serious essay on gentrification now cleanse your palate with this shirtless man.”

Jul 10 '14

lordbape:

i love how ancient egyptian artifacts will have like light blue, light red, accessories and details on them, and to restore them to show how they’d look back then, these scholars repaint them these dark, rich, vivid colors. but then the skin will be mid brown on the artifact and yet they make it 10 shades lighter and suggest that the egyptians would be white lmao. what the fuck kind of logic is that? every paint they used gets lighter as it ages but mysteriously, if we restore it, the skin would be lighter as opposed to darker in real life even though every single other detail is recreated as darker like it would be back then.

Jul 9 '14

tranqualizer:

i’m so over these studies that are like “the children of gay/lesbian couples perform better than those of heterosexual couples” because they basically still reinforce heteronormative nuclear families without really considering/examining/critiquing the ways in which non-normative families are constructed, queer or not, and how they’re influenced by race, class, gender, etc. 

but i’m not a gay white man adopting little brown children so

Jul 8 '14

petitsirena:

sticks and stones may break my bones, but language dictates everything from social norms to legislation and it’s indeed often used to bolster violence and oppression sooOo

Jul 7 '14

Anonymous asked:

Growing up in a white family, did you ever wish you would have grown up in a black family or feel like you were missing out?

onlyblackgirl:

Yes, all the time. Don’t me wrong, I love my family and i think they did good with what resources they had, but as far as culture, my own identity and sanity i certainly never felt like i belonged and always felt lost.

I also grew up in a predominantly white city so i didn’t even have a black community i could connect with, it was literally just me and other transracially adopted family members going thru the same thing till high school. So i really had and still have a hard time connecting with my family members simply because i don’t feel like i have anything in common with them, it has gotten a bit better now mainly with my mom, we actually talk about race & racism quite a bit but it still feels like we try to tiptoe around the elephant in the room that “hey guess what, you have 3 black kids in your family, we are not and never will be white”. 

People always ask me if i could’ve switched, would i, and that is always a hard question for me to answer. Growing up in a black family certainly would have made my life easier and less stressful, but i think i would have also taken a considerably different path in life and would not have turned out to be the person i am today.