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BRAND X

Orphaned transracial international ungrateful insurgent Class Bastard.

Posts tagged decolonize

Jul 22 '14
youngblackandvegan:

accras:

queensphynxe:

She just stared for the longest time.

OMG…I love this. This is important.

v important! representation matters more than words can express
but this picture about sums it up :)

youngblackandvegan:

accras:

queensphynxe:

She just stared for the longest time.

OMG…I love this. This is important.

v important! representation matters more than words can express

but this picture about sums it up :)

Jul 13 '14
jeromewaznice:

newblackschool:

ancestralvoices:

“Can you name one African God? How can you then define yourself, the very true essence of yourself and the very essence of your soul and organise the very nature of your life here on earth based on a god handed to us by our slave master and say that you have no slave consciousness?” Dr. Amos N. Wilson.
 Ancestral Voices: Esoteric African Knowledge
Website
FaceBook 
Twitter 

Food for Thought. 

I can name several. Still doesn’t invalidate what he’s saying….

jeromewaznice:

newblackschool:

ancestralvoices:

“Can you name one African God? How can you then define yourself, the very true essence of yourself and the very essence of your soul and organise the very nature of your life here on earth based on a god handed to us by our slave master and say that you have no slave consciousness?” Dr. Amos N. Wilson.

 Ancestral Voices: Esoteric African Knowledge

Website

FaceBook 

Twitter 

Food for Thought. 

I can name several. Still doesn’t invalidate what he’s saying….

Jul 13 '14
"Apparently, women of color were wearing their hair in such fabulous ways, adding jewels and feathers to their high hairdos and walking around with such beauty and pride that it was obscuring their status. This was very threatening to the social stability (read: white population) of the area at the time. The law was meant to distinguish women of color from their white counterparts and to minimize their beauty."
Jul 13 '14

soyeahso:

I love tumblr so much because it’s like “Here’s a serious essay on gentrification now cleanse your palate with this shirtless man.”

Jul 10 '14

lordbape:

i love how ancient egyptian artifacts will have like light blue, light red, accessories and details on them, and to restore them to show how they’d look back then, these scholars repaint them these dark, rich, vivid colors. but then the skin will be mid brown on the artifact and yet they make it 10 shades lighter and suggest that the egyptians would be white lmao. what the fuck kind of logic is that? every paint they used gets lighter as it ages but mysteriously, if we restore it, the skin would be lighter as opposed to darker in real life even though every single other detail is recreated as darker like it would be back then.

Jul 9 '14

tranqualizer:

i’m so over these studies that are like “the children of gay/lesbian couples perform better than those of heterosexual couples” because they basically still reinforce heteronormative nuclear families without really considering/examining/critiquing the ways in which non-normative families are constructed, queer or not, and how they’re influenced by race, class, gender, etc. 

but i’m not a gay white man adopting little brown children so

Jul 8 '14

petitsirena:

sticks and stones may break my bones, but language dictates everything from social norms to legislation and it’s indeed often used to bolster violence and oppression sooOo

Jul 7 '14

Anonymous asked:

Growing up in a white family, did you ever wish you would have grown up in a black family or feel like you were missing out?

onlyblackgirl:

Yes, all the time. Don’t me wrong, I love my family and i think they did good with what resources they had, but as far as culture, my own identity and sanity i certainly never felt like i belonged and always felt lost.

I also grew up in a predominantly white city so i didn’t even have a black community i could connect with, it was literally just me and other transracially adopted family members going thru the same thing till high school. So i really had and still have a hard time connecting with my family members simply because i don’t feel like i have anything in common with them, it has gotten a bit better now mainly with my mom, we actually talk about race & racism quite a bit but it still feels like we try to tiptoe around the elephant in the room that “hey guess what, you have 3 black kids in your family, we are not and never will be white”. 

People always ask me if i could’ve switched, would i, and that is always a hard question for me to answer. Growing up in a black family certainly would have made my life easier and less stressful, but i think i would have also taken a considerably different path in life and would not have turned out to be the person i am today. 

Jun 27 '14
"To illustrate, Kendall found that the notion of ‘‘lesbian’’ was not helpful in understanding female–female relationships in Basotho. She found widespread, apparently normative erotic relationships among Basuto women, but this (including instances of cunnilingus) was not defined as sexual, and not a single Mosotho—to Kendall’s knowledge—defined herself as a lesbian. Kendall concludes that ‘‘love between women is as natural to Southern Africa as the soil itself, but that
homophobia is a Western import’’. She emphasizes that Basotho society has not constructed a social category ‘‘lesbian.’’ Basotho women define sexual activity in such a way that makes lesbianism linguistically inconceivable."
Kendall, Jane (1998). In Murray, & Roscoe (Eds.), When a woman loves a woman in Lesotho ( pp. 221– 238). New York: St. Martins Press. (via thefemaletyrant)
Jun 25 '14

maghrabiyya:

ok after i reblogged that last post i had to go download some of Jolipunk's photography to post on my blog

i love the ‘Fucking Tourists!’ series with. a. passion.