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BRAND X

Orphaned transracial international ungrateful insurgent Class Bastard.

Posts tagged bastard planet

Sep 30 '14

korwegianseoul:

Saw this posted….an adoptee is forbidden to learn his language where he is from as his adoptive father forbids it.  Normally I don’t use the term adoptive but in this case this father doesn’t deserve to be called a father with his narrow minded thinking!  

All adoptive parent’s please do not be like this prick of an adoptive dad. We as adoptees need to know about our history, our identity.  It doesn’t mean we are leaving you.  By doing this you are just pushing your adopted kid out of your family when all they needed was loving support. 

This is ethnocide, plain and simple.

Sep 25 '14

Currently sick. When I’ve recovered, remind me to do a proper post debunking the myth that Black adoptees aren’t adopted as much as non-Black adoptees are.

The reason most international adoptions are not Black is NOT because white saviors don’t want Black children (antiblackness takes many insidious forms and one of them is the notion that Black children must be “saved” from their own birth families and communities and their cultures erased)

The biggest reason why most international adoptees are not Black is because native and diasporic Black peoples have historically led the charge for family preservation.

On an international scale, Africa has generally had the strictest (read: REASONABLE) regulations to safeguard against child trafficking and abuse.

I’m not saying that other continents and regions have been lax — people these days forget just how big and consequential the Cold War & anticommunism geopolitics were and still are, which accounts for Asia still being the #1 child “supply” region. South America and Eastern Europe’s histories are just as complicated.

But everyone keeps citing that one dumbshit white American “Freakonomics” dude whose data doesn’t even cover the U.S., just one conveniently narrow domestic instance in a country that’s the biggest child “receiver” nation in entire world. Ugh.

unsungvoicesexperience ILU. X

(Source: brandx)

Sep 14 '14

note to followers

the ONLY people I maintain this space for are myself (decolonizing my mind) and fellow orphans, adoptees, and foster kids.
And to a certain extent, POC and indigenous parents looking to protect their communities against ethnocidal “Kill the Native, Save the Child” programs both international and domestic.

If you belong to one of the aforementioned groups, feel free to get in touch. There are a surprising number of class bastards on here, which is glorious, but it can be hard to find peers because there aren’t so many who post about adoption and orphanhood, which is also cool though, you do YOU bbs. <3

If you don’t belong to one of the aforementioned groups, you’re welcome to introduce yourself, but I really don’t give a fig one way or the other if you stick around, and I definitely don’t care about educating you. Sorry not sorry. 
X

(Source: brandx)

Sep 2 '14

soy-un-madridista asked:

I feel like crying right now because so many white people adopt Haitians and its our biggest fear that they won't get love and respect and that they'll have no opportunity to learn about their culture and one day they'll just forget about it.

My heart goes out to you, truly, I wish I could offer comfort and say your fear was unjustified.

I wish I could tell you that Haiti isn’t a target of the Evangelical crusade to traffick and indocrinate children with Christianity.
I wish I could tell you that this nation of heroes wasn’t being reduced to a supply country (adoption industry terminology for non-Western countries).
I wish I could tell you it isn’t true that adopted children are abused at higher rates than biological offspring.

Arm yourself with the truth, harsh as it may be, and know that the first generations of international class bastard adoptees have grown up and led the charge for THIS generation of adoptees.
Align yourself with us, support us, boost our signal, and I promise we will remake the world.

"you take our children
from
their beds
and
our arms.
these are the same children.
who are going
to take
the world
away
from
you.”
Nayyirah Waheed
Jul 22 '14
Jul 11 '14
"While the purported purpose of the bill is to reduce the number of children in orphanages, the opposite will most certainly result. According to Kathryn Joyce in The Child Catchers intercountry adoptions actually increase the number of children living in institutions: “Children who were not unparented or homeless before end up becoming institutionalized as a direct result of orphanages setting up shop in poor areas.”

The adoption industry helps create these institutions, often funded in large part, by grateful adoptive parents. As we’ve seen in the Ethiopian case, practitioners may falsely claim children are orphans in order to line their pockets with American money.

Furthermore, increasing intercountry adoptions runs the risk that children will be placed in unsafe homes where they may be killed, abused, or dumped into another unsafe home, as the recent series of stories on “re-homing” has shown us. It also diverts money which could be used to help children remain within their families."

[Birth Mother] First Mother Forum: Encouraging intercountry adoptions with hard cash

this article starts with the line ‘when half the faculty at Harvard and Boston College Law Schools endorse a bill that encourages poor countries to take children from their mothers and send them to the United States for adoption, you’d think something was amiss’ and it’s probably a sign i read too many (or just enough) adoption blogs that my first thought was ‘i thought that was the whole point of international adoption’.

(via keelanrosa)

"Children who were not unparented or homeless before end up becoming institutionalized as a direct result of orphanages setting up shop in poor areas.”

Jul 9 '14
Jul 7 '14

supraliminally:

brandx:

blackorphanreviews:

bastardplanet:

spacebunnysparkle-empress:

im going to adopt overseas just to spite these teenage shits lolz

This white American and would-be adoptive parent calls Black and POC adoptees “MONKEYS” and repeatedly issues ableist, infantilising attacks against international and transracial adoptees (many of whom are from non-English-speaking countries) based on their deviations from spacebunnysparkle-empress’s standards of English language.

white settlers smh.

White people and would-be adoptive parents, come collect your own^ I can’t even with this mess it’s horrificimage

it’s literally the “i came out to have a good time and i’m honestly feeling so attacked right now” meme as an actual living human being and not an internet joke

with the added bonus of calling POC ‘monkeys,’ pretending that she is a nice person via the condescending passive-aggressive ‘gosh you are SO ANGRY i just want to give you a hug i hope your life gets better :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :)’ shit plus she is the one who fucking started shit in the first place by going to someone who was a little bit pissed off about the MURDER OF A FUCKING CHILD, LITERALLY THE MURDER OF A CHILD and pulling the stupid tone-policing ‘wow you seem really angry have you considered my feelings????????’ horseshit

in short, literally scum that cannot be communicated with in any meaningful way

in more important news, to people who are capable of being communicated with in a meaningful way, educate yourselves about adoption. brandx’s tumblr is a good place to start. peaceshannon is also a really great resource, and so is bastardplanet. i won’t even tell you how to feel about it or what to think, because i think adoptees speak for themselves well enough. just read about it and think about it. read and then think about: who makes money off international adoption, what options are available other than shipping kids overseas, what issues cause people to give up children for adoption in the first place, what effect having to give up a child has on disenfranchised women, what effect it has on the children given up, what kind of culture exists among so-called ‘orphan addicts’ and what attitude they have towards the children they purport to love, whether or not it’s really true that there are more ‘orphans’ than there are people looking to adopt, whether or not adopting a child is really a public service in a world with millions of kids with no one willing to take them (here’s a hint: this is a myth) — anyway, i could go on. i genuinely think that if rational people look at the facts about international adoption with an open mind, they’ll probably be shocked by a lot of what they find, and at the very least they’ll rethink the wisdom of adopting internationally.

Reblogging for supraliminally’s grade A analogy.

Also— holy shite, it’s seriously been something over 2 weeks now and OP is STILL going around attacking adoptees. How do such trolls live? I don’t even have enough time for people I like. X

Jul 7 '14

hummingbirdhearted:

I know this is a useless shout into the void but here goes:

I’m adopted and I’m trying to find my younger birth brother who was also adopted by a different family (complicated I know) but if you can help PLEASE let me know

Here are the things I know for sure:

  • My name is Haleigh, I was born on August 28th 1993 in New Braunfels, Texas.
  • My birthparents are named Gordon and Dixie
  • I have three older birthsiblings: Brandi, Brennan, and Gordon III. They were not given up. I’m not sure why my younger brother and I were.
  • They live in Seguin, TX (or they used to)
  • My younger birth brother was born either a year or three years after me (my adopted family can’t remember. They were going to adopt him, but didn’t have enough money ?? I think. They don’t like to talk about it.)
  • The family who adopted him live in Dallas? Maybe Austin. (again my parents couldn’t remember)
  • My adoption was through a lutheran service? So his might have been too.
  • We’ve never met, but I’d like to (but only if he wants to)

If any of this sounds familiar to anyone please message me. I know it’s super vague like I don’t know his name or birthdate, but I would really appreciate anything. 

BOOOOST

p.s. please don’t dismiss your efforts as useless. It takes tremendous courage to begin the search, and the good news is that connecting with birth family is nowhere NEAR as improbable as it once was. Even on this platform I see breakthroughs happening every day for adoptees.

I had a lot less information than this to start with, and still had some of my birth family members found via the internet! The future is now. Good luck and glory be to you. X

Jun 25 '14
pleasedotheneedful:

socimages:

#intagrammingafrica: The narcissism of global voluntourism.
By Lauren Kascak with Sayantani DasGupta PhD
An article in The Onion mocks voluntourism, joking that a 6-day visit to a rural African village can “completely change a woman’s facebook profile picture.”  The article quotes “22-year old Angela Fisher” who says:

I don’t think my profile photo will ever be the same, not after the experience of taking such incredible pictures with my arms around those small African children’s shoulders.

It goes on to say that Fisher “has been encouraging every one of her friends to visit Africa, promising that it would change their Facebook profile photos as well.”
I was once Angela Fisher. But I’m not any more.
***
I have participated in not one but three separate, and increasingly disillusioning, international health brigades, short-term visits to developing countries that involve bringing health care to struggling populations.
Such trips – critically called voluntourism — are a booming business, even though they do very little advertising and charge people thousands of dollars to participate.
How do they attract so many paying volunteers?
Photography is a big part of the answer.  Voluntourism organizations don’t have to advertise, because they can crowdsource.  Photography – particularly the habit of taking and posting selfies with local children – is a central component of the voluntourism experience. Hashtags like #InstagrammingAfrica are popular with students on international health brigades, as are #medicalbrigades, #globalhealth, and of course the nostalgic-for-the-good-days hashtag #takemeback.
It was the photographs posted by other students that inspired me to go on my first overseas medical mission. When classmates uploaded the experience of themselves wearing scrubs beside adorable children in developing countries, I believed I was missing out on a pivotal pre-med experience. I took over 200 photos on my first international volunteer mission. I modeled those I had seen on Facebook and even premeditated photo opportunities to acquire the “perfect” image that would receive the most “likes.”
Over time, I felt increasingly uncomfortable with the ethics of those photographs, and ultimately left my camera at home. Now, as an insider, I see three common types of photographs voluntourists share through social media: The Suffering Other, The Self-Directed Samaritan, and The Overseas Selfie.
The Suffering Other
In a photograph taken by a fellow voluntourist in Ghana (not shown), a child stands isolated with her bare feet digging in the dirt. Her hands pull up her shirt to expose an umbilical hernia, distended belly, and a pair of too-big underwear. Her face is uncertain and her scalp shows evidence of dermatological pathology or a nutritional deficiency—maybe both. Behind her, only weeds grow.
Anthropologists Arthur and Joan Kleinman note that images of distant, suffering women and children suggest there are communities incapable of or uninterested in caring for its own people. These photographs justify colonialist, paternalistic attitudes and policies, suggesting that the individual in the photograph…

…must be protected, as well as represented, by others. The image of the subaltern conjures up an almost neocolonial ideology of failure, inadequacy, passivity, fatalism, and inevitability. Something must be done, and it must be done soon, but from outside the local setting. The authorization of action through an appeal for foreign aid, even foreign intervention, begins with an evocation of indigenous absence, an erasure of local voices and acts.

The Self-directed Samaritan
Above we have a smiling young white girl with a French braid, medical scrubs, and a well-intentioned smile. This young lady is the centerpiece of the photo; she is its protagonist. Her scrubs suggest that she is doing important work among those who are so poor, so vulnerable, and so Other.
The girl is me. And the photograph was taken on my first trip to Ghana during a 10 day medical brigade. I’m beaming in the photograph, half towering and half hovering over these children. I do not know their names, they do not know my name, but I directed a friend to capture this moment with my own camera. Why?
This photograph is less about doing actual work and more about retrospectively appearing to have had a positive impact overseas. Photographs like these represent the overseas experience in accordance with what writer Teju Cole calls the “White Savior Industrial Complex.”
Moreover, in directing, capturing, and performing in photos such as these, voluntourists prevent themselves from actually engaging with the others in the photo. In On Photography, Susan Sontag reminds us:

Photography has become almost as widely practiced an amusement as sex and dancing – which means that…it is mainly a social rite, a defense against anxiety, and a tool of power.

On these trips, we hide behind the lens, consuming the world around us with our powerful gazes and the clicking of camera shutters. When I directed this photo opportunity and starred in it, I used my privilege to capture a photograph that made me feel as though I was engaging with the community. Only now do I realize that what I was actually doing was making myself the hero/star in a story about “suffering Africa.”
The Overseas Selfie

(Photo obtained from Global Brigades.)
In his New York Times Op-Ed, that modern champion of the selfie James Franco wrote:

Selfies are avatars: Mini-Me’s that we send out to give others a sense of who we are … In our age of social networking, the selfie is the new way to look someone right in the eye and say, “Hello, this is me.”

Although related to the Self-Directed Samaritan shot, there’s something extra-insidious about this type of super-close range photo. “Hello, this is me” takes on new meaning – there is only one subject in this photo, the white subject. Capturing this image and posting it on the internet is to understand the Other not as a separate person who exists in the context of their own family or community but rather, as a prop, an extra, someone only intelligible in relation to the Western volunteer.
***
Voluntourism is ultimately about the fulfillment of the volunteers themselves, not necessarily what they bring to the communities they visit. In fact, medical volunteerism often breaks down existing local health systems. In Ghana, I realized that that local people weren’t purchasing health insurance, since they knew there would be free foreign health care and medications available every few months. This left them vulnerable in the intervening times, not to mention when the organization would leave the community.
In the end, the Africa we voluntourists photograph isn’t a real place at all. It is an imaginary geography whose landscapes are forged by colonialism, as well as a good deal of narcissism. I hope my fellow students think critically about what they are doing and why before they sign up for a short-term global volunteer experience. And if they do go, it is my hope that they might think with some degree of narrative humility about how to de-center themselves from the Western savior narrative. Most importantly, I hope they leave their iphones at home.
Lauren Kascak is a graduate of the Masters Program in Narrative Medicine at Columbia University, where Sayantani DasGupta is a faculty member.  DasGupta is the editor of Stories of Illness and Healing and the author of The Demon Slayers and Other Stories and Her Own Medicine.

Totally. I get that volunteerism isn’t totally altruistic but I often see people take it to a level that comes off as totally disingenuous. Several years ago I probably would’ve been guilty of the same.
Also worthwhile to investigate candidate mission organizations and see what kind of long-term impact their work has on the local community… as touched on here, some end up doing more harm than good.

To name just one example: Child Trafficking &#8220;Orphan&#8221; Trade in Nepal Directly Fueled by Voluntourism
Because who gives a fuck about white peoples&#8217; narratives &amp;/ motivations really. The most salient point is that white voluntourism not only corrupts local infrastructure (a fact barely referenced and only by the end of the piece), but actively destroys the lives of non-Western people, then expects the survivors (most often children of color) to be grateful.

pleasedotheneedful:

socimages:

#intagrammingafrica: The narcissism of global voluntourism.

By Lauren Kascak with Sayantani DasGupta PhD

An article in The Onion mocks voluntourism, joking that a 6-day visit to a rural African village can “completely change a woman’s facebook profile picture.”  The article quotes “22-year old Angela Fisher” who says:

I don’t think my profile photo will ever be the same, not after the experience of taking such incredible pictures with my arms around those small African children’s shoulders.

It goes on to say that Fisher “has been encouraging every one of her friends to visit Africa, promising that it would change their Facebook profile photos as well.”

I was once Angela Fisher. But I’m not any more.

***

I have participated in not one but three separate, and increasingly disillusioning, international health brigades, short-term visits to developing countries that involve bringing health care to struggling populations.

Such trips – critically called voluntourism — are a booming business, even though they do very little advertising and charge people thousands of dollars to participate.

How do they attract so many paying volunteers?

Photography is a big part of the answer.  Voluntourism organizations don’t have to advertise, because they can crowdsource.  Photography – particularly the habit of taking and posting selfies with local children – is a central component of the voluntourism experience. Hashtags like #InstagrammingAfrica are popular with students on international health brigades, as are #medicalbrigades, #globalhealth, and of course the nostalgic-for-the-good-days hashtag #takemeback.

It was the photographs posted by other students that inspired me to go on my first overseas medical mission. When classmates uploaded the experience of themselves wearing scrubs beside adorable children in developing countries, I believed I was missing out on a pivotal pre-med experience. I took over 200 photos on my first international volunteer mission. I modeled those I had seen on Facebook and even premeditated photo opportunities to acquire the “perfect” image that would receive the most “likes.”

Over time, I felt increasingly uncomfortable with the ethics of those photographs, and ultimately left my camera at home. Now, as an insider, I see three common types of photographs voluntourists share through social media: The Suffering Other, The Self-Directed Samaritan, and The Overseas Selfie.

The Suffering Other

In a photograph taken by a fellow voluntourist in Ghana (not shown), a child stands isolated with her bare feet digging in the dirt. Her hands pull up her shirt to expose an umbilical hernia, distended belly, and a pair of too-big underwear. Her face is uncertain and her scalp shows evidence of dermatological pathology or a nutritional deficiency—maybe both. Behind her, only weeds grow.

Anthropologists Arthur and Joan Kleinman note that images of distant, suffering women and children suggest there are communities incapable of or uninterested in caring for its own people. These photographs justify colonialist, paternalistic attitudes and policies, suggesting that the individual in the photograph…

…must be protected, as well as represented, by others. The image of the subaltern conjures up an almost neocolonial ideology of failure, inadequacy, passivity, fatalism, and inevitability. Something must be done, and it must be done soon, but from outside the local setting. The authorization of action through an appeal for foreign aid, even foreign intervention, begins with an evocation of indigenous absence, an erasure of local voices and acts.

The Self-directed Samaritan

Above we have a smiling young white girl with a French braid, medical scrubs, and a well-intentioned smile. This young lady is the centerpiece of the photo; she is its protagonist. Her scrubs suggest that she is doing important work among those who are so poor, so vulnerable, and so Other.

The girl is me. And the photograph was taken on my first trip to Ghana during a 10 day medical brigade. I’m beaming in the photograph, half towering and half hovering over these children. I do not know their names, they do not know my name, but I directed a friend to capture this moment with my own camera. Why?

This photograph is less about doing actual work and more about retrospectively appearing to have had a positive impact overseas. Photographs like these represent the overseas experience in accordance with what writer Teju Cole calls the “White Savior Industrial Complex.”

Moreover, in directing, capturing, and performing in photos such as these, voluntourists prevent themselves from actually engaging with the others in the photo. In On PhotographySusan Sontag reminds us:

Photography has become almost as widely practiced an amusement as sex and dancing – which means that…it is mainly a social rite, a defense against anxiety, and a tool of power.

On these trips, we hide behind the lens, consuming the world around us with our powerful gazes and the clicking of camera shutters. When I directed this photo opportunity and starred in it, I used my privilege to capture a photograph that made me feel as though I was engaging with the community. Only now do I realize that what I was actually doing was making myself the hero/star in a story about “suffering Africa.”

The Overseas Selfie

1 (2)

(Photo obtained from Global Brigades.)

In his New York Times Op-Ed, that modern champion of the selfie James Franco wrote:

Selfies are avatars: Mini-Me’s that we send out to give others a sense of who we are … In our age of social networking, the selfie is the new way to look someone right in the eye and say, “Hello, this is me.”

Although related to the Self-Directed Samaritan shot, there’s something extra-insidious about this type of super-close range photo. “Hello, this is me” takes on new meaning – there is only one subject in this photo, the white subject. Capturing this image and posting it on the internet is to understand the Other not as a separate person who exists in the context of their own family or community but rather, as a prop, an extra, someone only intelligible in relation to the Western volunteer.

***

Voluntourism is ultimately about the fulfillment of the volunteers themselves, not necessarily what they bring to the communities they visit. In fact, medical volunteerism often breaks down existing local health systems. In Ghana, I realized that that local people weren’t purchasing health insurance, since they knew there would be free foreign health care and medications available every few months. This left them vulnerable in the intervening times, not to mention when the organization would leave the community.

In the end, the Africa we voluntourists photograph isn’t a real place at all. It is an imaginary geography whose landscapes are forged by colonialism, as well as a good deal of narcissism. I hope my fellow students think critically about what they are doing and why before they sign up for a short-term global volunteer experience. And if they do go, it is my hope that they might think with some degree of narrative humility about how to de-center themselves from the Western savior narrative. Most importantly, I hope they leave their iphones at home.

Lauren Kascak is a graduate of the Masters Program in Narrative Medicine at Columbia University, where Sayantani DasGupta is a faculty member.  DasGupta is the editor of Stories of Illness and Healing and the author of The Demon Slayers and Other Stories and Her Own Medicine.

Totally. I get that volunteerism isn’t totally altruistic but I often see people take it to a level that comes off as totally disingenuous. Several years ago I probably would’ve been guilty of the same.

Also worthwhile to investigate candidate mission organizations and see what kind of long-term impact their work has on the local community… as touched on here, some end up doing more harm than good.

To name just one example: Child Trafficking “Orphan” Trade in Nepal Directly Fueled by Voluntourism

Because who gives a fuck about white peoples’ narratives &/ motivations really. The most salient point is that white voluntourism not only corrupts local infrastructure (a fact barely referenced and only by the end of the piece), but actively destroys the lives of non-Western people, then expects the survivors (most often children of color) to be grateful.