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BRAND X

Orphaned transracial international ungrateful insurgent Class Bastard.

Posts tagged SOPA

Apr 28 '12

Tools To Protect Privacy

blackcathacker:

All In One Privacy

Hide My ASS - This websites offers everything from private encrypted chat to private file sharing and is useful for anyone looking for an all in one privacy service without having to go elsewhere.

Social Network -

World Truth - It is extremely rare to be able to find a social network website which is secure but this one is also aimed at exposing the same corrupt elite we all fight. Feel free to add us http://www.worldtruth.org/World_Under_Control/

Chat Software

Cryto Cat - If you want to chat online without being monitored then look no further because this website encrypts all messages sent and you can talk with up to 10 people per chat.

Zfone - Encrypt and secure your online calls with this software which can work with a number of VOIP clients, however it is in the testing stages and a little unnecessary because Skype is still secure (for now anyway).

Browsers

Tor Project - A simple yet effective tool for browsing the web anonymously, by using this tool you will have a broswer which uses a proxy to stop any of your online actions being traced, Simply download the browser and your set.

Search Engines

Protected Search - Another easy to use tool which works with Firefox as a plugin to stop google from monitoring your online movements such as connecting your searches to the sites you visit.

Start Page - A simpler tool than Protected Search because you don’t need to use Firefox or download anything, just simply go to the site and start searching without having your IP address traced.

Email Services

Thunderbird - This Firefox plugin will work along side Engimail email client to make sending and receiving emails a lot safer.

Mail To Web - Possibly the simplest secure email tool which you don’t need to register for and can simply login with you current email address and password.

What to do next

If you know anyone who is concerned about CISPA or their online privacy then please tell them about these and many more tools.

With these applications we could easily surf the web without anyone being able to track anything we do and best of all, it is completely legal.

Apr 28 '12

Proxy sites to browse the net anonymously

blackcathacker:

  • Anonymouse
    Anonymouse
     - It is fast, it is easy, and it is free!.
    Host: anonymouse.org
  • cIP-C
    cIP-C (Change IP Country)
     - The Change IP Country (cIPC) is our anonymizer program which acts as an HTTP or FTP proxy. Through it, you can can retrieve any resource that is accessible from the server this runs on. This is useful when your own access is limited, but you can reach a server that can in turn reach others that you can’t. Selection of various countries.
    Host: ns.km21103.keymachine.de
  • You Are Hidden
    You Are Hidden
     - Unblock any website and hide your ip address. Many options, like removing client side scripting (JavaScript), storing cookies in sessions etc.
    Host: vps22.lunarpages.com
  • Maximum Proxy
    Maximum Proxy
     - Browse the internet securely. You can unblock popular sites such as Orkut, Gmail, Yahoo, MySpace, Bebo, Facebook, YouTube, Friendster and many other sites. Feel free to browse 24/7.
    Host: www.maximumproxy.com
  • The Proxy Bay
    The Proxy Bay
     - Identity theft is a huge problem in today’s society. The transformation to online banking, checking, and bill paying has spawned a new avenue for thieves to steal from you. More important than money, though, is the personal information they can steal. Thieves use tactics commonly referred to as phishing. By using a proxy such as this one, you can greatly reduce your risk of identity theft.This website has a lot of partner websites also offering proxy surfing.
    Host: Depending on which partner
  • Nr1surf
    Nr1surf
     - The best and fastest free anonymous proxy. Surf and browse the web anonymously at school and work. Has a couple of partner websites in their proxy network.
    Host: Depending on which partner
  • BetterUnblock
    BetterUnblock
     - BetterUnblock is the better place to unblock websites at school or work. Using this site, you can unblock your favorite sites for free. Many options, like removing ads and having no referrer.
    Host: .
  • MySpace Unblocker
    MySpace Unblocker
     - If you’re not comfortable knowing that any web site out there can easily collect this data (and much more) about you everytime you surf the web, then you should take advantage of free anonymous proxy sites such as this one. Many options, like removing client side scripting (JavaScript), storing cookies in sessions etc.
    Host: .
  • BypassMyspace
    BypassMyspace
     - Myspace Proxy allows users to access any blocked sites at school or work. Normally in schools and work you have sites are blocked by certain filters, using this site, you can access them by simply entering their address here. Many options, like removing client side scripting (JavaScript), storing cookies in sessions etc.
    Host: ht8.hagioteam.com
  • Proxy 108
    Proxy 108
     - Is your right to privacy being attacked? Are sites that you frequent being blocked by network administrators without your consent? Do you want to bypass these filters and surf where you want, when you want? Has a couple of partner websites where you can browse under a proxy.
    Host: Depending on which partner
  • I am Unblocked
    I am Unblocked
     - Fast, easy and free anonymous webbrowsing. Many options, like removing client side scripting (JavaScript), storing cookies in sessions etc.
    Host: .
  • Sneaky Anon
    Sneaky Anon
     - Sneaky Anon is a free anonymous web based proxy service. With our service you can browse websites even from firewall or blocked ports. Another one with many stripping options.
    Host: t512.1paket.com
  • Proxy 24
    Proxy 24
     - Proxy24 is a free web proxy list that allows anonymous surfing and online privacy. This site lists their proxy partners. Choose one to browse.
    Host: Depending on which partner
  • Proxytor
    Proxytor
     - Browse the internet securely using Proxytor.net. You can unblock popular social networking sites such as MySpace, Bebo, Facebook, YouTube, Friendster and many other sites. Our proxy is faster than others.
    Host: German IP address
  • Top 10 Proxy
    Top 10 Proxy
     - This is a list of the best proxy websites, the proxies are web-based. Browse the internet securely by using our proxies. Another website listing their partner proxy websites.
    Host: Depending on which partner
  • Free MySpace layouts
    Free MySpace layouts
     - Free site where you can get links to Myspace Proxy, Hi5 Proxy, Friendster Proxy and Anonymous Proxing Serving Sites. Scroll down to enter the URL.
    Host: foley.globat.com
  • PinkSocks
    PinkSocks
     - Pinksocks works with Youtube. Now you can watch youtube videos anywhere without being blocked. If by popular demand, we will also add support for Break, DailyMotion, and MetaCafe. Really fast proxy.
    Host: 74.86.11.229-static.reverse.eukvps.com
  • VGY7
    VGY7
     - Use our service to hide your IP address and bypass your work/school web filter with ease. Select from PHP proxy and CGI proxy.
    Host: meshkini.com
  • SilverSurf
    SilverSurf
     - Free web-based proxy sites let you to bypass work and school security by fetching the website’s data themselves, and then sending it to you through the proxy site. Very fast proxy.
    Host: .
  • ProxyTop
    ProxyTop
     - Proxies are constantly being blocked by either schools work or your country. Proxytop will provide you with fresh proxies to stay one step ahead at all times. Website listing lots of partner websites providing a proxy. Select one to browse the net.
    Host: Depending on which partner
Apr 22 '12
youranonnews:


COME TOGETHER TO STOP CISPA!
WHAT IS CISPA?
The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (H.R. 3523) is a bill introduced in the United States House of Representatives by Reps. Mike Rogers (D-MI) and C.A. “Dutch” Ruppersberger (D-MD) in late 2011. It amends the National Security Act of 1947 to allow private companies and US government intelligence agencies to share information regarding perceived cyber threats.
WHAT IS WRONG WITH CISPA?
1. CISPA’s language, particularly in reference to how it defines “cyber threat,” is far too broad. 
The bill’s definition of a “cyber threat” is so vague that it may potentially allow CISPA to encompass a far broader range of targets and data than initially contemplated by its authors. “Cyber threat” is a critical term in the bill, and is defined therein as:
…information directly pertaining to a vulnerability of, or threat to a system of network of a government or private entity, including information pertaining to the protection of a system or network from —
(A) efforts to degrade, disrupt, or destroy such system or network; or
(B) theft or misappropriation of private or government information, intellectual property, or personally identifiable information.
Under this overly broad, vague definition, whistleblowers and leakers such as Wikileaks, tech blogs carrying the latest rumours and gossip from companies, news and media sites publishing investigations, security researchers and whitehat pen testers, torrent sites (including our beloved Pirate Bay), and of course, yours truly, Anonymous, would all be ripe targets under this bill.
Additionally, as the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) notes, CISPA’s broad definition of “cybersecurity” is so vague as to leave open the door “to censor any speech that a company believes would ‘degrade the network.’” Going one step further, the bill’s inclusion of “intellectual property” provides for the strong possibility that both private companies and the federal government will likely be granted “new powers to monitor and censor communications for copyright infringement.” (Full EFF letter here)
2. CISPA demonstrates a complete disregard for reasonable expectations of privacy protection and essential liberties. 
As laid out, CISPA allows a large, nearly unchecked quantity of any and all information on a target to be obtained and shared between private companies and government agencies. The bill’s text states, “Notwithstanding any other provision of law, a self-protected entity may, for cybersecurity purposes…share such cyber threat information with any other entity, including the Federal Government.”
Why is this problematic? As it stands, CISPA’s text allows for a slippery slope of information and data that could be shared amongst private companies and the federal government without any regard for a target’s personal privacy protections. Such information could very well include account names and passwords, histories, message content, and other information not currently available to agencies under federal wiretap laws.
In a position letter addressed to Congress on 17 April 2012, CISPA critics point out:
CISPA  creates  an  exception  to  all  privacy  laws  to  permit  companies  to  share  our   information  with  each  other  and  with  the  government  in  the  name  of  cybersecurity.   Although  a  carefully-­‐crafted  information  sharing  program  that  strictly  limits  the   information  to  be  shared  and  includes  robust  privacy  safeguards  could  be  an   effective  approach  to  cybersecurity,  CISPA  lacks  such  protections  for  individual   rights.    CISPA’s  ‘information  sharing’  regime  allows  the  transfer  of  vast  amounts  of   data,  including  sensitive  information  like  internet  use  history  or  the  content  of   emails,  to  any  agency  in  the  government  including  military  and  intelligence  agencies   like  the  National  Security  Agency  or  the  Department  of  Defense  Cyber   Command. 
3. The broad language in CISPA provides for the uncertain future expansion of federal government powers and a slippery slope of cybersecurity warrantless wiretapping. 
Of particular concern is the word “notwithstanding,” which is a dangerously broad word when included in legislation. The use of “notwithstanding” will allow CISPA to apply far beyond the stated intentions of its authors. It is clear that the word was purposefully included (and kept throughout rewrites) by the bill’s authors to allow CISPA to supersede and trump all existing federal and state civil and criminal laws, including laws that safeguard privacy and personal rights.
The fact that the sponsors and authors of CISPA claim that they have no intentions to use the overly broad language of the bill to obtain unprecedented amounts of information on citizens should be of little comfort to a concerned onlooker. As it stands, if CISPA passes in Congress and is signed into law by the President, its broad language WILL be law of the land and WILL be available for use by agencies and companies as desired. Why should our only protection against rampant cyber-spying be us trusting the government or companies NOT to take CISPA over the line of acceptable (if any) data collection?
WOW, CISPA SUCKS! HOW CAN I HELP STOP IT?
Below are some various ways that YOU can get involved in the online and real world struggles against CISPA. It will take all of us to stop this bill, but we did it before with SOPA, PIPA, and hopefully ACTA, and we’re confident that it can be done once more with CISPA. The voice of the People WILL be heard loud and clear, and you can help because your voice matters. It’s time to stand up for your rights because, in the end, who else will? Internet, unite!
Educate a Congressman about the Internet and pitfalls of CISPA - here
Call a Congressman directly about the bill - here
Email a Congressman directly about the bill - here
Sign and pass around online petitions - here || here || here
Spread awareness. Tweet, blog and post about CISPA. Use the hashtags #StopCISPA and #CISPA so everyone can follow. Change your profile picture to an anti-CISPA image or add a STOP CISPA banner.
Tweet to CISPA’s proponents, @HouseIntelComm and @RepMikeRogers and let them know about the pitfalls of CISPA.
Let CISPA’s sponsor, Rep. MikeRogers, know how much his bill fails - here
Check out Fight For The Future’s #CongressTMI movement in regard to CISPA - here
Join the Twitter Campaign and Contact a Representative about CISPA - here
Protest. Organise in front of Congress and let them know what happens when they try to govern the Internet and strip our liberties in the name of national security. If you organise an IRL protest, please contact us @YourAnonNews so we can facilitate spreading the word on it and helping boost attendance.
I WANT TO LEARN EVEN MORE ABOUT CISPA! TELL ME MORE!
Ok…clearly you like reading and knowing the issues thoroughly. Below are some more helpful resources that you can check out to get an even BETTER understanding of CISPA and how it will affect the world of tomorrow should it pass and become law.
Full text of CISPA, including recent rewrites and Amendments - here
Full list of CISPA co-sponsors - here
Full list of companies and groups that explicitly support CISPA - here
INFOGRAPHIC on CISPA - here
Center for Democracy & Technology’s CISPA Resource Page - here
Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Statement on CISPA and its Intellectual Property Implications 
Video news report from RT, ‘CISPA is a US cyber-security loophole’ - watch
CNET In-Depth: Even an attempted rewrite of CISPA failed to safeguard civil liberties and privacy - read
CISPA is pushed by a for-profit cyber-spying lobby that stands to profit immensely from the bill becoming law in the US - read
Why CISPA Sucks - read
A brilliant series of TechDirt articles on CISPA shed some light on the bill and point out exactly where its flaws are found -CISPA is a Really Bad Bill, and Here’s Why - read Did Congress Really Not Pay Attention to What Happened with SOPA? CISPA Ignorance is Astounding - read Forget SOPA, You Should Be Worried About This Cybersecurity Bill - read
NOTE: Even Obama seems to dislike CISPA — On 17 April 2012, the White House issued a statement criticising CISPA for lacking strong privacy protections and failing to set forth basic security standards.

youranonnews:

COME TOGETHER TO STOP CISPA!

WHAT IS CISPA?

The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (H.R. 3523) is a bill introduced in the United States House of Representatives by Reps. Mike Rogers (D-MI) and C.A. “Dutch” Ruppersberger (D-MD) in late 2011. It amends the National Security Act of 1947 to allow private companies and US government intelligence agencies to share information regarding perceived cyber threats.

WHAT IS WRONG WITH CISPA?

1. CISPA’s language, particularly in reference to how it defines “cyber threat,” is far too broad. 

The bill’s definition of a “cyber threat” is so vague that it may potentially allow CISPA to encompass a far broader range of targets and data than initially contemplated by its authors. “Cyber threat” is a critical term in the bill, and is defined therein as:

…information directly pertaining to a vulnerability of, or threat to a system of network of a government or private entity, including information pertaining to the protection of a system or network from —

(A) efforts to degrade, disrupt, or destroy such system or network; or

(B) theft or misappropriation of private or government information, intellectual property, or personally identifiable information.

Under this overly broad, vague definition, whistleblowers and leakers such as Wikileaks, tech blogs carrying the latest rumours and gossip from companies, news and media sites publishing investigations, security researchers and whitehat pen testers, torrent sites (including our beloved Pirate Bay), and of course, yours truly, Anonymous, would all be ripe targets under this bill.

Additionally, as the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) notes, CISPA’s broad definition of “cybersecurity” is so vague as to leave open the door “to censor any speech that a company believes would ‘degrade the network.’” Going one step further, the bill’s inclusion of “intellectual property” provides for the strong possibility that both private companies and the federal government will likely be granted “new powers to monitor and censor communications for copyright infringement.” (Full EFF letter here)

2. CISPA demonstrates a complete disregard for reasonable expectations of privacy protection and essential liberties. 

As laid out, CISPA allows a large, nearly unchecked quantity of any and all information on a target to be obtained and shared between private companies and government agencies. The bill’s text states, “Notwithstanding any other provision of law, a self-protected entity may, for cybersecurity purposes…share such cyber threat information with any other entity, including the Federal Government.”

Why is this problematic? As it stands, CISPA’s text allows for a slippery slope of information and data that could be shared amongst private companies and the federal government without any regard for a target’s personal privacy protections. Such information could very well include account names and passwords, histories, message content, and other information not currently available to agencies under federal wiretap laws.

In a position letter addressed to Congress on 17 April 2012, CISPA critics point out:

CISPA  creates  an  exception  to  all  privacy  laws  to  permit  companies  to  share  our   information  with  each  other  and  with  the  government  in  the  name  of  cybersecurity.   Although  a  carefully-­‐crafted  information  sharing  program  that  strictly  limits  the   information  to  be  shared  and  includes  robust  privacy  safeguards  could  be  an   effective  approach  to  cybersecurity,  CISPA  lacks  such  protections  for  individual   rights.    CISPA’s  ‘information  sharing’  regime  allows  the  transfer  of  vast  amounts  of   data,  including  sensitive  information  like  internet  use  history  or  the  content  of   emails,  to  any  agency  in  the  government  including  military  and  intelligence  agencies   like  the  National  Security  Agency  or  the  Department  of  Defense  Cyber   Command. 

3. The broad language in CISPA provides for the uncertain future expansion of federal government powers and a slippery slope of cybersecurity warrantless wiretapping. 

Of particular concern is the word “notwithstanding,” which is a dangerously broad word when included in legislation. The use of “notwithstanding” will allow CISPA to apply far beyond the stated intentions of its authors. It is clear that the word was purposefully included (and kept throughout rewrites) by the bill’s authors to allow CISPA to supersede and trump all existing federal and state civil and criminal laws, including laws that safeguard privacy and personal rights.

The fact that the sponsors and authors of CISPA claim that they have no intentions to use the overly broad language of the bill to obtain unprecedented amounts of information on citizens should be of little comfort to a concerned onlooker. As it stands, if CISPA passes in Congress and is signed into law by the President, its broad language WILL be law of the land and WILL be available for use by agencies and companies as desired. Why should our only protection against rampant cyber-spying be us trusting the government or companies NOT to take CISPA over the line of acceptable (if any) data collection?

WOW, CISPA SUCKS! HOW CAN I HELP STOP IT?

Below are some various ways that YOU can get involved in the online and real world struggles against CISPA. It will take all of us to stop this bill, but we did it before with SOPA, PIPA, and hopefully ACTA, and we’re confident that it can be done once more with CISPA. The voice of the People WILL be heard loud and clear, and you can help because your voice matters. It’s time to stand up for your rights because, in the end, who else will? Internet, unite!

  • Educate a Congressman about the Internet and pitfalls of CISPA - here
  • Call a Congressman directly about the bill - here
  • Email a Congressman directly about the bill - here
  • Sign and pass around online petitions - here || here || here
  • Spread awareness. Tweet, blog and post about CISPA. Use the hashtags #StopCISPA and #CISPA so everyone can follow. Change your profile picture to an anti-CISPA image or add a STOP CISPA banner.
  • Tweet to CISPA’s proponents, @HouseIntelComm and @RepMikeRogers and let them know about the pitfalls of CISPA.
  • Let CISPA’s sponsor, Rep. MikeRogers, know how much his bill fails - here
  • Check out Fight For The Future’s #CongressTMI movement in regard to CISPA - here
  • Join the Twitter Campaign and Contact a Representative about CISPA - here
  • Protest. Organise in front of Congress and let them know what happens when they try to govern the Internet and strip our liberties in the name of national security. If you organise an IRL protest, please contact us @YourAnonNews so we can facilitate spreading the word on it and helping boost attendance.

I WANT TO LEARN EVEN MORE ABOUT CISPA! TELL ME MORE!

Ok…clearly you like reading and knowing the issues thoroughly. Below are some more helpful resources that you can check out to get an even BETTER understanding of CISPA and how it will affect the world of tomorrow should it pass and become law.

  • Full text of CISPA, including recent rewrites and Amendments - here
  • Full list of CISPA co-sponsors - here
  • Full list of companies and groups that explicitly support CISPA - here
  • INFOGRAPHIC on CISPA - here
  • Center for Democracy & Technology’s CISPA Resource Page - here
  • Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Statement on CISPA and its Intellectual Property Implications 
  • Video news report from RT, ‘CISPA is a US cyber-security loophole’ - watch
  • CNET In-Depth: Even an attempted rewrite of CISPA failed to safeguard civil liberties and privacy - read
  • CISPA is pushed by a for-profit cyber-spying lobby that stands to profit immensely from the bill becoming law in the US - read
  • Why CISPA Sucks - read
  • A brilliant series of TechDirt articles on CISPA shed some light on the bill and point out exactly where its flaws are found -

    CISPA is a Really Bad Bill, and Here’s Why - read 

    Did Congress Really Not Pay Attention to What Happened with SOPA? CISPA Ignorance is Astounding - read 

    Forget SOPA, You Should Be Worried About This Cybersecurity Bill - read

NOTE: Even Obama seems to dislike CISPA — On 17 April 2012, the White House issued a statement criticising CISPA for lacking strong privacy protections and failing to set forth basic security standards.

Apr 10 '12
Apr 8 '12
occupyallstreets:

CISPA Replaces SOPA As Internet’s Enemy No. 1 (Must Read)
The Internet has a new enemy. The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act of 2011 (CISPA), also known as H.R. 3523, is a “cybersecurity” bill in the House of Representatives. While CISPA does not focus primarily on intellectual property (though that’s in there, too), critics say the problems with the bill run just as deep. 
As with SOPA and PIPA, the first main concern about CISPA is its “broad language,” which critics fear allows the legislation to be interpreted in ways that could infringe on our civil liberties. The Center for Democracy and Technology sums up the problems with CISPA this way:

    •    The bill has a very broad, almost unlimited definition of the information that can be shared with government agencies notwithstanding privacy and other laws;    •    The bill is likely to lead to expansion of the government’s role in the monitoring of private communications as a result of this sharing;    •    It is likely to shift control of government cybersecurity efforts from civilian agencies to the military;    •    Once the information is shared with the government, it wouldn’t have to be used for cybesecurity, but could instead be used for any purpose that is not specifically prohibited.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) adds that CISPA’s definition of “cybersecurity” is so broad that “it leaves the door open to censor any speech that a company believes would ‘degrade the network.’”
Moreover, the inclusion of “intellectual property” means that companies and the government would have “new powers to monitor and censor communications for copyright infringement.”
Furthermore, critics warn that CISPA gives private companies the ability to collect and share information about their customers or users with immunity — meaning we cannot sue them for doing so, and they cannot be charged with any crimes.
According to the EFF, CISPA “effectively creates a ‘cybersecurity’ exemption to all existing laws.”

“There are almost no restrictions on what can be collected and how it can be used, provided a company can claim it was motivated by ‘cybersecurity purposes.’” the EFF continues.
“That means a company like Google, Facebook, Twitter, or AT&T could intercept your emails and text messages, send copies to one another and to the government, and modify those communications or prevent them from reaching their destination if it fits into their plan to stop cybersecurity threats.”

Read the full text of CISPA here, or the full official summary at the bottom of this page.
Read More
SIGN THE PETITION TO SAVE THE INTERNET FROM CISPA

occupyallstreets:

CISPA Replaces SOPA As Internet’s Enemy No. 1 (Must Read)

The Internet has a new enemy. The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act of 2011 (CISPA), also known as H.R. 3523, is a “cybersecurity” bill in the House of Representatives. While CISPA does not focus primarily on intellectual property (though that’s in there, too), critics say the problems with the bill run just as deep. 

As with SOPA and PIPA, the first main concern about CISPA is its “broad language,” which critics fear allows the legislation to be interpreted in ways that could infringe on our civil liberties. The Center for Democracy and Technology sums up the problems with CISPA this way:

    •    The bill has a very broad, almost unlimited definition of the information that can be shared with government agencies notwithstanding privacy and other laws;
    •    The bill is likely to lead to expansion of the government’s role in the monitoring of private communications as a result of this sharing;
    •    It is likely to shift control of government cybersecurity efforts from civilian agencies to the military;
    •    Once the information is shared with the government, it wouldn’t have to be used for cybesecurity, but could instead be used for any purpose that is not specifically prohibited.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) adds that CISPA’s definition of “cybersecurity” is so broad that “it leaves the door open to censor any speech that a company believes would ‘degrade the network.’”

Moreover, the inclusion of “intellectual property” means that companies and the government would have “new powers to monitor and censor communications for copyright infringement.

Furthermore, critics warn that CISPA gives private companies the ability to collect and share information about their customers or users with immunity — meaning we cannot sue them for doing so, and they cannot be charged with any crimes.

According to the EFF, CISPA “effectively creates a ‘cybersecurity’ exemption to all existing laws.”

There are almost no restrictions on what can be collected and how it can be used, provided a company can claim it was motivated by ‘cybersecurity purposes.’” the EFF continues.

That means a company like Google, Facebook, Twitter, or AT&T could intercept your emails and text messages, send copies to one another and to the government, and modify those communications or prevent them from reaching their destination if it fits into their plan to stop cybersecurity threats.

Read the full text of CISPA here, or the full official summary at the bottom of this page.

Read More

SIGN THE PETITION TO SAVE THE INTERNET FROM CISPA

Apr 2 '12
Mar 10 '12

(Source: yawnsper)

Mar 5 '12

Alternative to Google that allows complete Privacy

heymorticia:

Stop Using Google Search Please

beatyourselfup:

Stop using Google. If you don’t know why, you’re not paying attention.

Of course you could switch to Start Page. But I have found it to be unattractive and not rich enough in features. The only feature they have that I admire is the proxy feature and that’s slow and not very practical for most media driven purposes.

I highly recommend going with a lesser known search engine called “Duck Duck Go”. I have taken the time to build my own custom search options in the Duck Duck Go settings and I have exported those settings to the URL that I will use as my home page so that these settings are used every time I go “home”. You’re welcome to use my settings (linked below). These settings maximize privacy, minimize ads, and use colors that are pleasing to the eye after extended periods. Every settings has been thoroughly considered and nothing left to aesthetic preference.

Duck Duck Go has a militant stand on your privacy. Read their policy. They collect nothing.

If you’ve never heard of Duck Duck Go, you should really check out the “goodies” they offer. It’s absolutely incredible. Everything accessible from the search page. For example, try these searches: (take notice the box at the top that gives you the immediate answer)

Calories in 2 eggs

how many countries on Earth

birth date of bono

random number 1-100

random word

heads or tails

!amazon sex toys

July calendar

!torrent Linux

map 19460

$3.43+$34.45

There are so many commands and different possibilities. What with them adding the ability to query Wolfram|Alpha, it’s just amazing how instant your answers are, once you learn to use the proper syntax.

Anyway, I’m going on and on. Try it out. Take back your privacy. Get the hell out of those personal bubbles that search giants put you in. Quit making them filthy rich and oppressive. Your searches are your thoughts. Think about that.

It’s your privacy and it should stay that way.

https://duckduckgo.com/?ka=e&ke=-1&kh=1&kj=b2&ko=1&kp=-1&kt=o&ku=1&kv=1&kx=g&k1=-1&k2=1&k7=%23EFEFF7&k8=%233C3C3C&k9=%231C28CD&kaa=%23A41919&kab=r

If you would rather try the search engine without my settings, that’s okay too.

Mar 4 '12
thegoddamazon:

ilovecharts:

What The Internet Knows About You And How To Protect Yourself
This is one of my favorite Q&A’s I’ve ever done for Forbes. This morning, I exchanged emails with Sarah Downey, the author of the FTC complaint against people search website, BeenVerified.com, regarding Internet privacy, people search sites, background checks, Facebook and how to protect your online identity. There is A LOT to learn in there! 

Welp.

thegoddamazon:

ilovecharts:

What The Internet Knows About You And How To Protect Yourself

This is one of my favorite Q&A’s I’ve ever done for Forbes. This morning, I exchanged emails with Sarah Downey, the author of the FTC complaint against people search website, BeenVerified.com, regarding Internet privacy, people search sites, background checks, Facebook and how to protect your online identity. There is A LOT to learn in there! 

Welp.

Feb 28 '12
"The Internet is strange. It doesn’t make any money. It’s transnational, beyond anyone’s control. It is the great anarchist event."

William Gibson, interview with the Financial Times.

Srsly ambivalent re:”anarchist” label, but beyond that yea sure FUCK YEA BROHEIM Internet forever. X